View full screen - View 1 of Lot 2022. A life-size carved statuary marble hand of a lady with ruffled sleeve, possibly by Alexander Munro (1825-1871) executed as a study of the hand of the artist Henrietta Ward (1832-1924) 19th century | 十九世紀 大理石雕女性左手 或乃亞歷山大・孟洛(1825-1871年)臨摹畫家亨麗埃塔.沃德(1832-1924年)玉手之習作.
2022

A life-size carved statuary marble hand of a lady with ruffled sleeve, possibly by Alexander Munro (1825-1871) executed as a study of the hand of the artist Henrietta Ward (1832-1924) 19th century | 十九世紀 大理石雕女性左手 或乃亞歷山大・孟洛(1825-1871年)臨摹畫家亨麗埃塔.沃德(1832-1924年)玉手之習作

No reserve

Reserves

Estimate:

50,000

to
- 70,000 HKD

A life-size carved statuary marble hand of a lady with ruffled sleeve, possibly by Alexander Munro (1825-1871) executed as a study of the hand of the artist Henrietta Ward (1832-1924) 19th century | 十九世紀 大理石雕女性左手 或乃亞歷山大・孟洛(1825-1871年)臨摹畫家亨麗埃塔.沃德(1832-1924年)玉手之習作

A life-size carved statuary marble hand of a lady with ruffled sleeve, possibly by Alexander Munro (1825-1871) executed as a study of the hand of the artist Henrietta Ward (1832-1924) 19th century | 十九世紀 大理石雕女性左手 或乃亞歷山大・孟洛(1825-1871年)臨摹畫家亨麗埃塔.沃德(1832-1924年)玉手之習作

No reserve

Estimate:

50,000

to
- 70,000 HKD

Lot sold:

81,900

HKD

A life-size carved statuary marble hand of a lady with ruffled sleeve, possibly by Alexander Munro (1825-1871) executed as a study of the hand of the artist Henrietta Ward (1832-1924)

19th century

十九世紀 大理石雕女性左手 或乃亞歷山大・孟洛(1825-1871年)臨摹畫家亨麗埃塔.

沃德(1832-1924年)玉手之習作


25.6 by 12 by 9.3 cm

Overall good condition with minor flakes to the edges of the base.


整體品相良好,底座邊沿見細小剝落。


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Carlton Hobbs LLC, New York, 2017.
Carlton Hobbs LLC,紐約,2017年

Gracefully posed and sculpted, the present hand is likely modelled after that of Henrietta Ward (1832-1924), one of the most successful female Victorian painters of her time.


Born into a family of professional artists, several of whom were fellows of the Royal Academy, her father George Raphael Ward was a painter and engraver, her mother Mary a miniature specialist. Her paternal grandfather was the prominent animal painter James Ward, who served George III and the Prince of Wales, and was related to the great artists George Morland and John Jackson by marriage.


In 1848, Henrietta secretly married Edward Matthew Ward, a well-known historical painter with whom she had fallen in love at a very young age. Despite the sixteen-year age gap and strong disapproval from her family, the couple bore eight children, one of whom, notably, was Leslie Ward, the Vanity Fair caricaturist “Spy.”


As favourites of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, the Wards were invited back into London from Slough to work on royal commissions. Henrietta did not only paint portraits of the Queen and her children, but also became the children’s art teacher. Some of the most prominent artistic and literary icons, such as John Everett Millais, Charles Dickens, Lewis Carroll, and Wilkie Collins, were also closely connected with the Wards.


Henrietta devoted her life to empowering women, petitioning the Royal Academy to accept talented female artists and backing the women's suffrage movement. After her husband’s death in 1879, she even opened her own art school with an emphasis on training young female artists. ‘Her pupils were of an august kind, such as the Duchess of Connaught, and Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll and Edinburgh.’1 She continued to exhibit at home and abroad until 1921, when she held her last exhibition at the Royal Academy for the last time. In 1924, the 92-year-old master passed away at her home in Chelsea.


The handwritten label on the finely sculpted hand reads Hand of Matt Ward’s Wife / Carved in Italy 1850, albeit unsigned. This elegant piece is said to be a gift to the sitter from a sculptor friend Alexander Munro (1825-1871), who had known Ward at an early stage of their lives while studying in Italy. As a Pre-Raphaelite artist, Munro was famous for his commitment to naturalism and his simplistic but elegant treatment of his sculptures. He ‘had no rival in the graceful and fanciful treatment of children, [and his] portrait busts of women were distinguished for their refined and delicate sentiment.’2


1 Day, Michael. Henrietta Ward, A Victorian Artist in Slough. S.T.E.A.M, 2006.

2 Timbs, John. The Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art. London: Simpkin, Marshall, and Co. 1838.