View full screen - View 1 of Lot 50. Rome, a view of Saint Peter's from Monte Mario.
50

Sir Charles Lock Eastlake, P.R.A.

Rome, a view of Saint Peter's from Monte Mario

Sir Charles Lock Eastlake, P.R.A.

Sir Charles Lock Eastlake, P.R.A.

Rome, a view of Saint Peter's from Monte Mario

Rome, a view of Saint Peter's from Monte Mario

Sir Charles Lock Eastlake, P.R.A.

Plymouth, Devon 1793 - 1865 Pisa

Rome, a view of Saint Peter's from Monte Mario


oil on canvas, unlined

canvas: 20 7/8 by 26 in.; 56 by 66 cm. 

framed: 26 3/4 by 31 5/8 in.; 68 by 80.3 cm. 

The canvas has not been lined and remains stable and planar. Overall the paint layer has remained bright, with thicker details of impasto still evident, particularly in the tree at right. There is minimal craqueleure visible and the surface is covered in a thin, even varnish. Under ultraviolet light some previous restorations flouresce, though not many and they are not noticeable with the naked eye. The upper right corner of the composition, from about 5 inches below the top on the left edge and across to where the sky meets the try, flouresces, likely a strengthening due to previous abrasion. There are a few very small areas of inpainting in the tree and along the right edge in the middle of the canvas, as well as some small brushstrokes in the shadowed areas of the foreground. Much of the composition, particularly at center, remain untouched. Overall the painting presents well and can be hung as is. Offered in a carved giltwood frame.
In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.
The artist;
His studio sale, London, Christie's, 2 June 1894, lot 34;
There acquired by Sir Thomas Agnew & Sons, Ltd., London;
Anonymous sale, London, Christie's, 14 October 1988, lot 72;
Where acquired by Richard L. Feigen in 1988. 
K. Baetjer, Glorious Nature: British Landscape Painting 1750-1850, exhibition catalogue, New York 1993, p. 228, cat. no. 76;
D. de Selliers, ed., Stendahl. Voyages en Italie illustrés par les peintres du romantisme. Promenades dans Rome, Paris 2002, reproduced pp. 12-13. 
Denver, The Denver Art Museum, Glorious Nature: British Landscape Painting 1750-1850, 11 December 1993 - 6 February 1994, no. 76;
West Palm Beach, Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, Paintings and Drawings by English and French Masters of the 18th and 19th Centuries, 15 January - 14 February 1997.

Renowned as both a painter and an academic, Sir Charles Eastlake was a highly influential figure in the British art world in the mid-19th century and served as the first director of the National Gallery from 1855 until his death. His early years, however, were spent in Rome, where he lived from 1816 until 1830. He first established himself as a view painter despite his initial interest in history painting, and traveled extensively in Italy and throughout Europe. Indeed, at his Royal Academy debut in 1823, he presented three views of Rome, one of which was the finished composition of the present sketch (now lost); the other two depicted the Bridge and Castle of St. Angelo and the Colosseum from the Campo Vaccino.1


A warm morning sunlight bathes the scene of Saint Peter's Basilica from a distance, its dome standing tall, surrounded by the countryside. The view is taken from Monte Mario, which lies northwest of Rome and due north of the Vatican; the hill is high enough that one can clearly see the bright blue Mediterranean waters beyond the landscape. The quiet scene is interrupted only by a lone traveler in the foreground, walking along a dirt path with his donkey, just below an olive grove. Eastlake has captured the Italian light with great sensitivity and beauty to create both a glorious and a subtle depiction of the Eternal City. 


1. Now at the Tate, London, see https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/eastlake-the-colosseum-from-the-campo-vaccino-t00665