View full screen - View 1 of Lot 21. Charles I | Document signed, as Prince of Wales, granting Brampton Wood to John Craig, 10 December 1624.
21

Charles I | Document signed, as Prince of Wales, granting Brampton Wood to John Craig, 10 December 1624

Estimate:

700 - 900 GBP

Charles I | Document signed, as Prince of Wales, granting Brampton Wood to John Craig, 10 December 1624

Charles I | Document signed, as Prince of Wales, granting Brampton Wood to John Craig, 10 December 1624

Estimate:

700 - 900 GBP

Lot sold:

1,386

GBP

Charles I


Document signed, as Prince of Wales ("Charles P")


an indenture between Prince Charles and his legal representatives Sir Henry Hobart, Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas and the Prince's Chancellor, Sir James Fullerton, "Master of His hignes Wards and Libertyes [i.e. domains and properties], Sir John Walter, the Prince's Attorney general, and Sir Thomas Trevor, his Solicitor General, who hold on the Prince's behalf the manor of Brampton in Huntingdonshire, agreeing to lease to Dr John Craig "All that wood called Brampton wood conteyning by estimacion two hundred and Eleven acres", as well as 20 acres of meadow, for 31 years, for an annual rent of £19 18s. 4d., in a secretary hand with engrossed initial capital, 1 vellum membrane (***SIZE), countersigned at the foot by Hobart, Fullerton Walter and Trevor, with their four pendant seals on original vellum tags, ***PLACE, 10 December 1624


A LEASE OF WOODLAND TO A ROYAL PHYSICIAN. John Craig (d.1655) was one of two physicians to King James I and attended him in his final illness some three months after this lease was agreed. However he got into a furious dispute with the Duke of Buckingham, the royal favourite, over the King's treatment, which culminated in Buckingham driving Craig from the sickroom whilst Buckingham's mother knelt at the King's bedside demanding royal justice against accusations of poisoning. Craig was not to serve at court again until after Buckingham's death.


Brampton Wood, first recorded in the Domesday Book, was part of the manor of Brampton. This manor had been granted by King James to his Queen. On her death he granted it to the Duke of Buckingham but the manor passed back into royal hands when Buckingham exchanged it for other lands. In 1627 the manor was leased to the Earl of Manchester. The wood itself survives to this day. It was badly damaged by the Forestry Commission in the 1950s, who grubbed up ancient woodland to plant conifers, but is today a nature reserve supporting magnificent oaks as well as such rare species as wild service trees, hazel dormice, and black hairstreak butterflies.

Condition is described in the main body of the cataloguing, where appropriate


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.