View full screen - View 1 of Lot 128. JACOPO COPPI, CALLED DEL MEGLIO  |   PORTRAIT OF FRANCESCO I DE' MEDICI (1541 - 1587), HALF-LENGTH.
128

JACOPO COPPI, CALLED DEL MEGLIO | PORTRAIT OF FRANCESCO I DE' MEDICI (1541 - 1587), HALF-LENGTH

Reserves

Estimate:

25,000

to
- 35,000 USD

Property from Moretti Fine Art, Monaco, Sold Without Reserve. All proceeds to be donated to ChefsForAmerica COVID–19 Response

JACOPO COPPI, CALLED DEL MEGLIO | PORTRAIT OF FRANCESCO I DE' MEDICI (1541 - 1587), HALF-LENGTH

JACOPO COPPI, CALLED DEL MEGLIO | PORTRAIT OF FRANCESCO I DE' MEDICI (1541 - 1587), HALF-LENGTH

Estimate:

25,000

to
- 35,000 USD

Lot sold:

21,250

USD

Property from Moretti Fine Art, Monaco, Sold Without Reserve. All proceeds to be donated to ChefsForAmerica COVID–19 Response

JACOPO COPPI, CALLED DEL MEGLIO

Peretola 1523 - 1591 Florence

PORTRAIT OF FRANCESCO I DE' MEDICI (1541 - 1587), HALF-LENGTH


oil on panel

unframed: 22 1/2 x 17 3/8 in.; 57 x 44 cm. 

framed: 30 x 24 3/4 in.; 76.2 x 62.9 cm.

Painting is executed on a single plank of wood which is flat, stable, and uncradled. While there appears to have been a horizontal batten inset to the panel in the past, it no longer remains and does not appear necessary. Overall the picture presents well to the naked eye—the picture is clean, and the varnish is even. UV light reveals a few scattered retouches along the bridge of his nose and forehead. A couple of retouches are also visible in his beautiful red shirt, namely in the sleeves and one small concentrated aea in his chest. These are applied well and are not at all disturbing to the naked eye. The picture could easily be hung in its current condition. In a carved gilt and painted wood frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Private collection.

"This portrait presents an image of an elegant young gentleman, but it is only with the knowledge that it portrays Francesco de’ Medici, the heir of Grand Duke Cosimo I, that we are able to grasp Coppi’s subtle and incisive understanding of his sitter. Coppi was one of the team of artists that Francesco worked with to create his famous Studiolo, and this picture shows that the artist was more than familiar with the character of his subject, an inquisitive, imperious and brittle young man. With none of the Medicean pomp of an official portrait, this painting captures a part of the prince’s personality that would normally be hidden to us today."


Christopher Apostle


Francesco I de’ Medici was the second Grand Duke of Tuscany and ruled from 1574 until his death in 1587. Francesco levied high taxes on Florentines and could be despotic at times, but he also supported the development of the arts and sciences. In 1570, Francesco commissioned a group of artists, under the supervision of Giorgio Vasari, to decorate his Studiolo in the Palazzo Vecchio. Jacopo Coppi completed two paintings for the ensemble: The Invention of Gunpowder and the Family of Darius before Alexander the Great. Francesco had a close relationship with many of the artists who worked on the Studiolo and patronized them on other occasions; this portrait was likely completed between the completion of the Studiolo in 1572 and the start of Francesco’s reign as Grand Duke in 1574, as it lacks any emblems of power associated with that office and the Medici. The portrait was thus intended for a private viewing context. 


Shortly after his work on the Studiolo, Coppi received 3 commissions for altarpieces in major Florentine churches: The Pentecost for the Pieri altar in San Niccolò Oltrarno; The preaching of St. Vincent Ferrer for the Attavanti altar in Santa Maria Novella in 1574, and an Ecce Homo for the Zati altar in Santa Croce in 1576. The 1570s would be the most productive period of Coppi’s career. He also painted frescoes in San Pietro in Vincoli in Rome as well as commissions for a few Bolognese churches. Although Coppi was not known primarily as a portraitist, Carlo Falciani, to whom we are grateful, has confirmed the attribution of this painting to Coppi on the basis of comparison with donor portraits included in some of Coppi’s altarpieces. 


All proceeds to be donated to ChefsForAmerica COVID –19 Response, a subsidiary of Chef José Andrés’ World Central Kitchen, a relief effort to feed people who are victims of the financial strains due to the coronavirus. To donate, please go to https://wck.org/