View full screen - View 1 of Lot 133. GEORGES FRÉDÉRIC ZIESEL  |  BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE AND A BIRD’S NEST ON A MARBLE TABLE.
133

GEORGES FRÉDÉRIC ZIESEL | BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE AND A BIRD’S NEST ON A MARBLE TABLE

Estimate:

20,000

to
- 30,000 USD

Property from Mireille Mosler Ltd., New York

GEORGES FRÉDÉRIC ZIESEL | BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE AND A BIRD’S NEST ON A MARBLE TABLE

GEORGES FRÉDÉRIC ZIESEL | BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE AND A BIRD’S NEST ON A MARBLE TABLE

Estimate:

20,000

to
- 30,000 USD

Lot sold:

27,500

USD

Property from Mireille Mosler Ltd., New York

GEORGES FRÉDÉRIC ZIESEL

Hoogstraeten 1756 - 1809 Antwerp

BOUQUET OF FLOWERS IN A VASE AND A BIRD’S NEST ON A MARBLE TABLE


signed lower left: JF Ziesel

oil on panel

unframed: 12⅜ x 10¼ in.; 31.4 by 26 cm.

framed: 19¼ x 17 in.; 48.9 x 43.2 cm.

The painting is executed on a beautiful single oak panel which is flat, stable, uncradled, and beveled on the reverse. The paint layer is clean and bright, and the picture could be hung in its current condition. UV light reveals some possible strengthening in the shadows of the greens of the flowers, as well as a small area at the right side of the bird’s nest. The picture presents very well to the naked eye. In a carved giltwood frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Private collection, Amsterdam, until circa 1990, when bought by;

Private collection, Amsterdam, until 2015;

From whom acquired. 

"I certainly tend instinctively to see extravagant still-lifes of bouquets of flowers like this as quintessentially Dutch, and totally 17th-century in taste, forgetting how enduring and widespread was the demand for paintings of this type. Ziesel clearly made a very successful career for himself painting these still-lifes for a late 18th/early 19th-century Parisian audience, who must have delighted both in the beauty of his compositions and in the refinement and variety of his touch."


Gregory Rubinstein



Joris Frederik, later known as Georges Frédéric Ziesel, was born in Hoogstraten, Flanders in 1756. Although he was one of the most prominent still life painters in Flanders at the time, little is known about his life. At the age of fourteen, Ziesel became an orphan and settled in Antwerp. It is unclear whether he received his training at the Academy in Antwerp as his name is not found in any of the registers. His colleagues Pieter Faes (1750-1814) and Balthasar Paul Ommeganck (1755–1826) both studied at the Academy, perhaps an indication that he was somehow affiliated with the school. Ziesel married in 1780 but remained childless throughout his life. He spent and worked a good part of his career in Paris where he exhibited at the Salon of 1802. Upon his return to Antwerp, he was included in the Salons of 1805 and 1809. Ziesel died in Antwerp on June 26, 1809. Ziesel painted still lifes on panel as well as on glass, a technique he must have learned in France. Paintings by Ziesel are quite rare, always depicting table top still lifes of floral arrangements in vases on a marble ledge. Sometimes enhancing his compositions with fruit; in the present floral still life the accompanying object is a tender depiction of a quail's nest with its fragile quail eggs. Ziesel’s paintings reveal a close kinship to his better-known contemporary Cornelis van Spaendonck (1756-1839), who also trained in Antwerp and then moved to Paris.