View full screen - View 1 of Lot 9. A river landscape with sailing boats, possibly a view on the Wijkermeer | 《河上帆船風景,應為維格米爾的景觀》.
9

Salomon van Ruysdael

A river landscape with sailing boats, possibly a view on the Wijkermeer | 《河上帆船風景,應為維格米爾的景觀》

Estimate:

80,000

to
- 120,000 GBP

Property from the Collection of Peter Baltzer | 彼得・巴爾澤收藏

Salomon van Ruysdael

Salomon van Ruysdael

A river landscape with sailing boats, possibly a view on the Wijkermeer | 《河上帆船風景,應為維格米爾的景觀》

A river landscape with sailing boats, possibly a view on the Wijkermeer | 《河上帆船風景,應為維格米爾的景觀》

Estimate:

80,000

to
- 120,000 GBP

Lot sold:

63,000

GBP

Property from the Collection of Peter Baltzer

彼得・巴爾澤收藏

Salomon van Ruysdael

薩洛蒙・凡・雷斯達爾

Naarden circa 1602 - 1670 Haarlem

A river landscape with sailing boats, possibly a view on the Wijkermeer

《河上帆船風景,應為維格米爾的景觀》


signed on the leeboard of the boat lower left: SvR

款識:藝術家在帆船披水板上簽名SvR(左下)

oil on oak panel, the reverse with an unidentified wax collector's seal

油彩橡木畫板,背面有佚名鑑藏蠟印

24.1 x 32.4 cm.; 9 1/2 x 12 3/4 in.

24.1 x 32.4 公分;9 ½ x 12 ¾ 英寸

The following condition report is provided by Henry Gentle who is an external specialist and not an employee of Sotheby's:


Salomon van Ruysdael River landscape Oil on panel, in a modern black wood frame


The oak panel is in a good preserved state. It is evenly chamfered on three sides only. The wood grain is vertical; there are no splits or deformations. The paint layer is very well preserved. The paint texture and impasted highlights are in good original condition. Under u-v light restored diagonal scratches across the surface are visible. These bite in to the paint layer and have caused minor paint loss. Very slight aged thinning of the paint layer in the sky has revealed a little more of the ground layer than was originally envisaged; moderate reduction of this, particularly around the church spire, has been undertaken. There has been some over ambitious restoration applied to reduce natural discolouration to some small areas and some of finer details such as the rigging have ben augmented. The chromatic and tonal values are still retained. Slight tonal improvement would be achieved by removal of the varnish.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

With P. de Boer Amsterdam, exhibited Summer 1955;

Where acquired by the mother and step-father of the present owner.

W. Stechow, Salomon van Ruysdael, Berlin 1975, p. 114, no. 302B.

From around 1640 onwards, Salomon van Ruysdael began to paint river and estuary scenes, constantly re-visiting the theme of small sailing vessels navigating the inland stretches of water around Haarlem and elsewhere in the Netherlands. These boats are typically shown in calm conditions, often at sunrise or sunset, and usually arranged in receding diagonals in order to create perspective. This simple compositional design allowed Ruysdael to concentrate, especially in the vertical variations of the format, upon the cloudy skies and their effects on the waters below. Their viewpoint is often, as here, very low, creating the illusion that the viewer is on a similar boat close by. These river scenes were indebted to the work of Jan van Goyen (1596–1656), the most important and prolific artist of this important phase of Dutch landscape painting, but Ruysdael introduced subtle colour variations to the more monochromatic effects of his contemporary, applying his paint quickly and fluently, usually without the aid of preliminary drawing. These scenes were always painted on a small scale, and in some of the very smallest and latest examples, Ruysdael's brushwork becomes increasingly free. The riverscapes themselves were usually imaginary or composed, for Ruysdael's interests were in the skies and the waters rather than any concern for topographical precision. The church in the centre of the horizon is probably intended for, or at least modelled upon, that of Beverwijk, a prominent landmark on the edge of the of the waters of the Wijkermeer. The church was included in a number of similar river scenes by Ruysdael, including those in the the Staatliche Museen in Berlin and and Bacon Collection in Norfolk.1 The large castle or abbey to the right may perhaps be inspired by the nearby Huis Assumberg, but is most likely to be imaginary. It is seen from the other side in the distance of another another river scene, sold London, Sotheby's, 8 July 2009, lot 3. Another church stands in the same relationship to it in that picture as here, but has no spire.


1 See H.J.J. Scholtens, ‘Salomon van Ruysdael in de contreien van Holland's landengte’, Oud Holland, vol. LXXVII, part I, 1962, pp. 1–10, figs 1 and 5; Stechow 1975, pp. 110, 115, nos 280 and 311, reproduced figs 52 and 54.