ZARINA | UNTITLED
ZARINA | UNTITLED
ZARINA | UNTITLED
ZARINA | UNTITLED
ZARINA | UNTITLED
ZARINA | UNTITLED
1

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MARCIA GILMARTIN

ZARINA | UNTITLED

Estimate: 18,000 - 25,000 USD

12

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MARCIA GILMARTIN

ZARINA | UNTITLED

Estimate: 18,000 - 25,000 USD

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Lot Details

Description

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF MARCIA GILMARTIN

ZARINA

b. 1937

UNTITLED 


Wood collage on board

Signed 'ZARINA' in pencil on reverse. Bearing Gallery Chanakya label on reverse 

25 ½ x 23 ⅝ in. (64.7 x 60 cm.)

Executed in late 1960s - early 1970s 

Condition Report

To request a condition report for this lot, please contact sarah.ritzmann@sothebys.com.


Cataloguing

Provenance

Acquired from Gallery Chanakya, New Delhi circa 1970s

Exhibited

Durham, North Carolina, Nasher Museum of Art, Duke University, Lines of Control: Partition as a Productive Space, 19 September 2013 – 2 February 2014

Literature

D. Gilmartin, Civilization and Modernity: Narrating the Creation of Pakistan (New Perspectives on Indian Pasts), Yoda Press, New Delhi, May 2017, cover illustration

Catalogue Note

In the late 1960s/early 1970s, Zarina made bold compositions using planks of wood that are reminiscent of fences and cages. She took planks of wood and ingrained them onto paper – revealing every crack and grain of the wood. 'These images of confinement suggest illusory thresholds to her life of travel and freedom from convention.' (A. Pesenti, Zarina: Paper Like Skin, Hammer Museum and DelMonico Books, Prestel 2012, p. 15) As is often the case with her works – the title gives the viewer a way of entering and understanding the work. While the present lot is untitled, there is a work called Wall – a relief print from collaged wood which is almost like a mirror image of the current work. Accordingly, we could consider the present work to represent a wall made of wood chips - It could be thought of as a wall of one of her many homes or as a wall blocking her freedom at the time as a woman or as a wife. The space between the various woodchips may refer to cracks or ways letting the light in through the wall.


The wood chips on board create a wonderful composition, highlighting the various shades of brown inherent in wood – some dark, some light set against the darkish, uniformly brown color of the board. The artistic process of putting the chips of wood together is apparent – making the artist’s hand visible.


Modern & Contemporary South Asian Art
Live Auction Begins:16 Mar 2020 | 03:00 PM GMT