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145

JACOB JORDAENS | CHRIST TRIUMPHANT AMONG THE NINE PENITENTS

Estimate:

200,000

to
- 300,000 USD

Property from a Distinguished Private collection, Washington, D.C.

JACOB JORDAENS | CHRIST TRIUMPHANT AMONG THE NINE PENITENTS

JACOB JORDAENS | CHRIST TRIUMPHANT AMONG THE NINE PENITENTS

Estimate:

200,000

to
- 300,000 USD

Lot sold:

441,000

USD

Property from a Distinguished Private Collection, Washington, D.C.

JACOB JORDAENS

Antwerp 1593 - 1678

CHRIST TRIUMPHANT AMONG THE NINE PENITENTS


oil on canvas

39½ by 52½ in.; 100.3 by 133.5 cm.

The following condition report has been provided by Simon Parkes of Simon Parkes Art Conservation, Inc. 502 East 74th St. New York, NY 212-734-3920, simonparkes@msn.com, an independent restorer who is not an employee of Sotheby's.


This work is well restored. The canvas has a lining applied with a non-wax adhesive which is still effective. The texture of the paint layer remains very lively and uncompromised. There is an original vertical canvas join running about 3 inches from the left side. The retouches along this join could be slightly improved. The remainder of the picture shows very few retouches of note, and there do not appear to be any structural damages. There is an attractive visible patina to the paint layer.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Private collection, France;

With Richard Feigen, New York;

From whom acquired, 2005. 

This large, impressive canvas by the Flemish Baroque artist Jacob Jordaens is teeming with energy, color, and the figural form. Like his predecessor Peter Paul Rubens, in this painting, Jordaens showcases his skills in capturing the beauty of the human form, with the flesh tones serving as pleasing contrasts to the opulent fabrics that further enliven the packed and dynamic composition. At the center appears Christ, triumphant over sin and death, whose pose and muscular physique not only serve as the focal point, but also seem to have been inspired by the figure of Christ in Rubens’ Glorification of the Eucharist, an oil sketch of circa 1630-1632 in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He is surrounded in the present work by nine penitents: to the left, the paralyzed man carrying his bed on his neck, the Prodigal Son, Mary Magdalene, and the Woman of Samaria; to the right, Saint Peter, the Tax Collector, Judas Taddeus, the good thief with his cross, and the crowned King David kneeling in the foreground. Such a pedagogic theme, imbued with the doctrine of Redemption and devotion, would have been easily recognized by the Catholic reformed society in Antwerp during this period. 


In addition to his skills as a painter, Jordaens was a prolific draughtsman, and this canvas can be securely linked to a number of his autograph drawings, including a study of a kneeling man in a pose similar to that of King David1 as well as a sketch of a pig that relates closely to that found in the lower left corner of the present work behind the Prodigal Son.2 But perhaps the most important drawing of this group, perhaps preliminary in conception, is one of the same subject today preserved in the Kupferstichkabinett der Staatliche Museen Berlin.3 An inscribed date on the reverse of that drawing reads 1629, a date that Michael Jaffé suggested as the approximate date for the present work when it first appeared on the market in 2005. A slightly later date of circa 1635-1640 has more recently been suggested. 


1. R.A. d'Hulst, Jordaens drawings, London 1974, vol. I, cat. no. A105, reproduced fig. 117.

2. Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum, inv. no. A1847. See d'Hulst 1974, cat. no. A107, reproduced fig. 119. 

3. Inv. no. 5737. See d'Hulst 1974, cat. no. A93, reproduced fig. 102.