View full screen - View 1 of Lot 80. A KAKIEMON-STYLE DISH FUKU MARK | EDO PERIOD, LATE 17TH CENTURY.
80

A KAKIEMON-STYLE DISH FUKU MARK | EDO PERIOD, LATE 17TH CENTURY

A GROUP OF CERAMICS FOR THE EXPORT MARKET | THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

A KAKIEMON-STYLE DISH FUKU MARK | EDO PERIOD, LATE 17TH CENTURY

A KAKIEMON-STYLE DISH FUKU MARK | EDO PERIOD, LATE 17TH CENTURY

A GROUP OF CERAMICS FOR THE EXPORT MARKET

THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

A KAKIEMON-STYLE DISH FUKU MARK

EDO PERIOD, LATE 17TH CENTURY


the lobed form decorated in underglaze blue with a fishing boat on a river and figures on the banks on either side, chocolate rims

27 cm., 10⅝ in. diam.


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Firing frits and minor surface wear.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

Detailed figural subjects of this kind were popular in the Netherlands and were copied around 1785 both in Loosdrecht porcelain and Delft faience.


For a similar example, see the exhibition catalogue of the Hong Kong Museum of Art, Interaction in Ceramics: Oriental Porcelain & Delftware (Hong Kong, 1984), p. 114, pl. 69.