View full screen - View 1 of Lot 122. Ansel Adams' Living Room, Carmel.
122

Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams' Living Room, Carmel

Estimate:

6,000 - 9,000 USD

Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams' Living Room, Carmel

Ansel Adams' Living Room, Carmel

Estimate:

6,000 - 9,000 USD

Lot sold:

8,190

USD

Ansel Adams

1902 - 1984

Ansel Adams' Living Room, Carmel


unique Polaroid print, framed, an Andrew Smith Gallery, Santa Fe, label on the reverse, circa 1965

image: 4 1/2 by 3 1/2 in. (11.5 by 8.9 cm.)

frame: 15 7/8 by 14 7/8 in. (40.3 by 37.8 cm.)

This unique Polaroid print is in generally excellent condition. There is some pitting to the surface and dark brown stains along the edges on the reverse, both inherent results of processing.


'AA/1996' is written in pencil on the reverse.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Lubbock, Texas Tech University, Ansel Adams: American Master, Selections from the David H. Arrington Collection, August 2015 – January 2016
'Mr. and Mrs. Adams found a spot they wanted on the wildly beautiful California coastline below Carmel.  They asked an old friend, Architect Eldridge T. Spencer, to fit a house to the land and mold it about their established way of living.  Their only conditions were that the house be ruggedly simple and informally spacious. . . To enable the Adams' to share their daily lives, the entire main floor (at entry level) is given over to the integration of their special needs - the combining of everyday living and working functions.  As a result, Mr. Adams can pop in and out of his darkroom as easily as Mrs. Adams moves to and from the kitchen, and visitors who drop in for a chat in the living room during working hours seldom find themselves unattended by one or the other of their busy, but gracious hosts.' (House Beautiful, March 1965)