View full screen - View 1 of Lot 7. CHARLES FRANÇOIS DAUBIGNY | LA MAHOURA À CAUTRETS.
7

CHARLES FRANÇOIS DAUBIGNY | LA MAHOURA À CAUTRETS

Estimate:

70,000

to
- 90,000 USD

Property from a Private Collection, Japan

CHARLES FRANÇOIS DAUBIGNY | LA MAHOURA À CAUTRETS

CHARLES FRANÇOIS DAUBIGNY | LA MAHOURA À CAUTRETS

Estimate:

70,000

to
- 90,000 USD

Lot sold:

69,300

USD

Property from a Private Collection, Japan

CHARLES FRANÇOIS DAUBIGNY

French

1817 - 1878

LA MAHOURA À CAUTRETS


signed Daubigny (lower left)

oil on canvas

canvas: 38⅜ by 51⅜ in.; 97.5 by 130.5 cm

framed: 48⅞ by 61⅝ in.; 124 by 156.5 cm

The following condition report was kindly provided by Simon Parkes Art Conservation, Inc.:


This work is restored and could be hung in its current state. The canvas has been lined, using a non-wax adhesive. The paint layer is cleaned, varnished and retouched. The darker colors show remnants of an old varnish and have a milky appearance under ultraviolet light. There seems to be a long break in the canvas in the rocks to the right of the waterfall, that has been retouched. Other retouches can be clearly seen under ultraviolet light. They are quite extensive in the sky and in the lighter colors in the waterfall. There is a diagonal break in the canvas that has been repaired and received retouches in the lower center of the sky, near the trees. There is a repaired long, thin, complex break in the widest part of the waterfall, extending from the rocks on the left into the rocks on the right. The condition is uneven, but the work looks well.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

The artist's studio (and sold, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, May, 6-8, 1878, lot 295)

Sale: Sotheby's, London, December 1, 1965, lot 138, illustrated (as La cascade de Mahoura, Cauterets)

Sale: Christie's, New York, October 13, 1994, lot 86, illustrated

Acquired at the above sale

Robert Hellebranth, Charles-François Daubigny 1817-1878, Morges, 1976, p. 183, no. 557, illustrated


Charles François Daubigny’s father and uncle were artists and he formed his interest in the family business at a young age. A sickly child, Daubigny’s parents sent him to the small village of Valandmois, where he stayed with family friends and fell in love with the countryside. While his art training was rather informal, his talent and family connections meant that by the age of 17 he was restoring paintings at the Musée du Louvre under the direction of François-Marius Granet. He travelled in Italy, Spain and England and spent time in the atelier of Paul Delaroche before finding success with a prize at the Salon of 1848. In 1852, he met Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, the beginning of a long friendship which saw the two artists travel together throughout France and Switzerland.


The landscapes Daubigny submitted to the Salons of the 1840s and 1850s reflect his fascination with water.  La Mahoura à Cautrets depicts an idyllic mountain stream in the spa town and ski resort of Cautrets in the Pyrénées of south-western France. The rushing water, marked by teal highlights, rocky landscape and verdant shades of green, provided a large-scale composition ideally suited to Daubigny’s spontaneous and broad, painterly brushstrokes. As Daubigny’s style further matured, he found commercial success while earning the respect of the artistic community, leading to his appointment to the Salon jury in 1865. It was in this position that he supported the acceptance of works by Camille Pissarro, Claude Monet, Alfred Sisley and Edgar Degas.