View full screen - View 1 of Lot 8. JEAN-BAPTISTE-CAMILLE COROT | COLLINES ET PÂTURES DES ENVIRONS DE SAINT-LO.
8

JEAN-BAPTISTE-CAMILLE COROT | COLLINES ET PÂTURES DES ENVIRONS DE SAINT-LO

Estimate:

150,000

to
- 200,000 USD

Property from a Private Collection, Japan

JEAN-BAPTISTE-CAMILLE COROT | COLLINES ET PÂTURES DES ENVIRONS DE SAINT-LO

JEAN-BAPTISTE-CAMILLE COROT | COLLINES ET PÂTURES DES ENVIRONS DE SAINT-LO

Estimate:

150,000

to
- 200,000 USD

Lot sold:

151,200

USD

Property from a Private Collection, Japan

JEAN-BAPTISTE-CAMILLE COROT

French

1796 - 1875

COLLINES ET PÂTURES DES ENVIRONS DE SAINT-LO


signed COROT (lower right)

oil on canvas

canvas: 18¼ by 29¾ in.; 46.5 by 75.5 cm

framed: 27½ by 38½ in.; 70 by 98 cm


We would like to thank Martin Dieterle and Claire Lebeau for kindly confirming the authenticity of this lot. 

The following condition report was kindly provided by Simon Parkes Art Conservation, Inc.:


This work has not recently been restored. The canvas is lined. There is a diagonal wave in the canvas in the upper left corner and another in the lower right. In the landscape and largest tree, the only retouches are on the center of the top edge. In the center of the sky, there are retouches to some cracking and possibly small losses, which have slightly discolored.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

M. Latouche, Paris (by January 30, 1875)

Wildenstein, New York (by 1952 and in 1969)

Acquired in the late 1980s

Alfred Robaut, L'Oeuvre de Corot, Catalogue raisonné et illustré, vol. II, Paris, 1965, p. 120, no. 341, illustrated p. 121

Paris, Durand-Ruel, Exposition rétrospective de Tableaux et Dessins des Maître Modernes, 1878, no. 118 (as Collines près Saint Lô and lent by M. Latouche)

New York, Wildenstein, Corot, October 30-December 6, 1969, no. 27 (lent by Wildenstein)

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot’s biographers, Étienne Moreau-Nélaton and Alfred Robaut, write very little about his paintings from the early 1830s. After Corot returned from his first Italian trip in 1828, he spent the next few years traveling extensively in the French countryside before returning to northern Italy in May 1834. His French tour took him to previously familiar sites, such as Ville d’Avray and the Forest of Fontainebleau, as well as new regions in Burgundy, the Auvergne and the Normandy coast, including the village of Saint-Lô, the setting of the present work painted circa 1835-40. Dotted with Romanesque churches and rustic farmsteads, the varied landscapes of these regions provided Corot with new inspiration and allowed him to pursue the plein air techniques and innovations he had learned in Italy.


While most of Corot’s views of Saint-Lô from this period are small compositions, the present work is a bold panoramic view on a relatively large scale. Here, light saturates the countryside, illuminating the grazing cows casting dark shadows against gentling rolling ground. The deep greens of the trees and shifting golden hues of the fields create a sensory effect of welcome cool shade in the bright heat of summer. Small figures populate the landscape, including two girls sitting atop an earthen wall and a fieldworker in the distance, a barely perceptible form as he merges with the landscape.


Corot’s view of Saint-Lô provides a unique glimpse of the pastoral French countryside that 100 years later would become one of the most important battle sites of the Invasion of Normandy during World War II.