AN ITALIAN MICROMOSAIC PANEL OF TIVOLI, ROME SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
AN ITALIAN MICROMOSAIC PANEL OF TIVOLI, ROME SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
AN ITALIAN MICROMOSAIC PANEL OF TIVOLI, ROME SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
AN ITALIAN MICROMOSAIC PANEL OF TIVOLI, ROME SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
2

PROPERTY FROM THE ROSALINDE AND ARTHUR GILBERT COLLECTION

AN ITALIAN MICROMOSAIC PANEL OF TIVOLI, ROME SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 GBP

PROPERTY FROM THE ROSALINDE AND ARTHUR GILBERT COLLECTION

AN ITALIAN MICROMOSAIC PANEL OF TIVOLI, ROME SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 GBP

Lot Sold:37,500GBP

Lot Details

Description

Property From The Rosalinde And Arthur Gilbert Collection

AN ITALIAN MICROMOSAIC PANEL OF TIVOLI, ROME SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY


depicting the temples of Sibyl and Vesta, the St. Martino Bridge and the cascades of the Aniene River

without frame: 44.5cm. high, 71.5cm. wide; 1ft. 5 1/2 in., 2ft. 4 1/8 in.

with frame: 65cm. high, 92cm. wide, 11.5cm. deep; 2ft. 1 3/4 in., 3ft. 1/4 in. 4 1/2 in.

Condition Report

The panel in overall excellent condition. The frame with some losses to the carved mouldings, especially to the tips of the acanthus leaves. And generally with minor chipping and losses to gilding. The back of the frame with a LACMA label and the inventory number L.83.18.2.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Saleroom Notice

Please note that this lot will be sent to the warehouse after the sale.

Cataloguing

Provenance

Possibly William Randolph Hearst (1863-1951);

Archbishop Edward Hoban, Rockford, Illinois;

acquired from Sloan Auctions, Washington D.C., 9 October 1977, lot 1359.

Exhibited

Los Angeles, 1979;

Vatican, Mosaici Minuti Romani Del '700 e Del '800, 15 October-30 November 1986;

Gilbert Collection, Permanent Display, Somerset House, London, 2000-2007.

Literature

J. H. Gabriel, with contributions by Anna Maria Massinelli and essays by Judy Rudoe and Massimo Alfieri, Micromosaics: The Gilbert Collection, London, 2000, cat. no. 101, p. 169.

A. González-Palacios, and Steffi Röttgen with essays by Steffi Röttgen, Claudia Przyborowski; essays and new catalogue material translated by Alla Theodora Hall, The Art of Mosaics: Selections from the Gilbert Collection, Los Angeles, 1982, cat. no. 100, p.205.

Catalogue Note

This vibrantly coloured panel, of unusually large scale, depicts a particular view of Tivoli, favoured by painters and Grand-Tour enthusiasts. The subject of the Temples of Vesta and Sibyl was widespread amongst mosaicists who saw the opportunity to reproduce the monuments as souvenirs of the Grand Tour for their aristocratic clientele. The present panel is an important example showing the temples, St. Martino bridge and the spectacular cascading waterfalls of the Aniene river.


Originally called Tibur, Tivoli was founded on the Monti Tiburtini (Tiburtine Hills) five centuries before Rome in 1215 B.C. and became known for its sulphur mineral water springs. Accessed from the St. Martino bridge, the so-called Temple of Sibyl, and nearby the Temple of Vesta were erected towards the end of the Roman Republic in the early first century BCE. As one of the most famous monuments of Ancient Tibur, the Temples of Sibyl and Vesta, although often confused with one another, were one of the most frequently drawn and painted sites in the 19th century.


The circular temple, a colonnaded round monoptera, was probably dedicated to Vesta, the goddess of the hearth, whose cult was entrusted to the Vestals, or perhaps to Tiburno, the hero who gave his name to the city. The Temple of Sibyl is supposedly dedicated to the Tiburtine Sybil or Albunea worshipped as a goddess in Tivoli and bestowed with prophetic powers.

STONE: Marble and Hardstones
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