JAKOB BOGDÁNY | A LANDSCAPE WITH A PEACOCK, A MAGPIE, AND OTHER VARIOUS BIRDS
JAKOB BOGDÁNY | A LANDSCAPE WITH A PEACOCK, A MAGPIE, AND OTHER VARIOUS BIRDS
JAKOB BOGDÁNY | A LANDSCAPE WITH A PEACOCK, A MAGPIE, AND OTHER VARIOUS BIRDS
JAKOB BOGDÁNY | A LANDSCAPE WITH A PEACOCK, A MAGPIE, AND OTHER VARIOUS BIRDS
JAKOB BOGDÁNY | A LANDSCAPE WITH A PEACOCK, A MAGPIE, AND OTHER VARIOUS BIRDS
JAKOB BOGDÁNY | A LANDSCAPE WITH A PEACOCK, A MAGPIE, AND OTHER VARIOUS BIRDS
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JAKOB BOGDÁNY | A LANDSCAPE WITH A PEACOCK, A MAGPIE, AND OTHER VARIOUS BIRDS

Estimate: 12,000 - 18,000 USD

JAKOB BOGDÁNY | A LANDSCAPE WITH A PEACOCK, A MAGPIE, AND OTHER VARIOUS BIRDS

Estimate: 12,000 - 18,000 USD

Lot Sold:23,750USD
(13 bids, reserve met)

Lot Details

Description

JAKOB BOGDÁNY

Eperjes circa 1660 - 1724 London

A LANDSCAPE WITH A PEACOCK, A MAGPIE, AND OTHER VARIOUS BIRDS


signed lower right: J. Bogdani

oil on canvas

canvas: 48¾ by 54⅝ in.; 123.8 by 138.7 cm.

framed: 53¼ by 59 in.; 135.4 by 149.9 cm.

Condition Report

Canvas is lined. A decorative image reads well under a dirty surface with some details to the feathers of the birds well preserved, like the peacock. There is some minor thinning to the surface of the darker hues. Pindots of loss are here and there, like in the center of the neck of the peacock, but nothing too distracting, especially for a work of this size. A squared spot of repair, that has been strengthened, is in the two central hens at far left. This spot appears rubbed and has a small tear in the wing of one of the hens. A line of inpainting, which has slightly discolored, runs horizontally from the extreme edges at about 4 in. from the bottom edge. This likely addresses either a fold or line of craquelure caused by an old stretcher bar. The varnish fluoresces unevenly making it difficult to read, though there appears to be further spots of repair scattered at center and bottom left, close to the edge. Minor abrasions are along the edges, though these are not too distracting. Painting could improve in appearance if the tear and rubbing are addressed. Offered in a gold frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

Cataloguing

Provenance

Anonymous sale, London, Christie's, 8 May 1931, lot 47 (as Attributed to Jacob Bogdany), to McDonald, for £25-4;

Chemical Bank, New York, by 1964;

From whom acquired by the present owner in 2004.

Catalogue Note

With this painting of domestic and exotic fowl in a grandiose garden setting, Bogdány is following in the tradition of Melchior d'Hondecoeter. Bogdány would have been familiar with the work of Hondecoeter during his residence in Amsterdam between 1684 and 1686. Such influence can be seen not only in the obvious choice of animal subject, but also in the motifs decorating the landscape, like the stone wall ruins in the foreground along with the architectural structure beyond.


Following his time in Amsterdam, Bogdány settled in London where his vivid still life and bird paintings were coveted by the aristocracy. Queen Mary and Queen Anne were among his clientele, and it was through Queen Anne that Bogdány met Admiral George Churchill (1654-1710), the younger brother of John, 1st Duke of Marlborough. Churchill had an aviary full of unusual birds at Windsor, which perhaps inspired Bogdány's fascination with accurately depicting birds as demonstrated in this painting. Many of the birds depicted here reoccur with variations in other paintings by Bogdány [1].


1. See Jacob Bogdani, c. 1660-1724, exhibition catalogue, London 1989, no. 9 and 19.

Old Masters Online
Online bidding closed30 Oct 2019 | 05:11 PM GMT