View full screen - View 1 of Lot 10. PROBABLY ITALIAN, CIRCA 1300 | SIGNET RING.
10

PROBABLY ITALIAN, CIRCA 1300 | SIGNET RING

Estimate:

12,000 - 18,000 GBP

Rings from a Distinguished Spanish Collection (lots 10 and 11)

9

10

11

PROBABLY ITALIAN, CIRCA 1300 | SIGNET RING

PROBABLY ITALIAN, CIRCA 1300 | SIGNET RING

Estimate:

12,000 - 18,000 GBP

Lot sold:

15,000

GBP

Rings from a Distinguished Spanish Collection (lots 10 and 11)

PROBABLY ITALIAN, CIRCA 1300

SIGNET RING


inscribed with a partially legible inscription: + S. DEVDONEDVBELLO (?)

gold, set with a garnet intaglio

18mm., ¾in.

ring size: K

Overall the condition of the ring is good with minor dirt and wear to the surface consistent with age. There are various very minor abrasions and scratches to the gold. There are a few very slight gaps between the setting and stone.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

E. Guilhou, Paris, by 1912;

Sotheby's London, 11 December 1986, lot 202;

private collection, Spain (acquired through Spink & Sons, 1986)

Catalogue of a Collection of Ancient Rings formed by the Late E. Guilhou, Paris, 1912, p. 154, no. 1273, pl. XIX

The present signet ring comes from one of the greatest collections of rings assembled around the turn of the last century by Monsieur G. Guilhou of Paris. It is published in the 1912 catalogue (illustrated) but appears not to have been sold in the 1937 Sotheby's sale of the Guilhou collection. Intaglios and cameos, ancient or contemporary, were often incorporated into rings in the medieval period, and, according to Martin Henig, were intended to serve as a sigillum secreti (seals of secret significance used for personal correspondence). According to Henig, such gems were prized, as is evidenced by a Statute of Edward I dated to 1300 ordering that 'gravers or cutters of stones, and of seals shall give to each their weight of silver and gold, as near as they can, upon their fidelity'. Compare with ring in the British Museum illustrated by Dalton (op. cit.) and that exhibited as part of a private collection by Les Enluminures in 2014 (op. cit.). Note also the signet ring in the Victoria and Albert Museum London (inv. no. M.290-1962).


RELATED LITERATURE

O. M. Dalton, The Franks Bequest, Catalogue of the Finger Rings, cat. British Museum, London, 1912 pl.III; M. Henig, 'The re-use and copying of ancient intaglios set in Medieval personal seals mainly found in England: an aspect of the Renaissance of the 12th century', in J. Cherry and J. Robinson (eds.), Good Impressions: image and authority in medieval seals, London, 2007, pp. 25-34; S. Hindman and D. Scarisbrick, Toward an Art History of Medieval Rings: A Private Colllection, exh. cat., Les Enluminures, 2014, no. 19; . Cherry and M. Henig, 'Intaglios Set in Medieval Seal Matrices: Indicators of Political Power and Social Status?' in J. Cherry, J. Berenbeim and L. de Beer (eds.), Seals and Status: The Power of Objects, The British Museum, London, 2018, pp. 104-113