View full screen - View 1 of Lot 259. ATTRIBUTED TO WOLFGANG HEIMBACH | YOUNG GIRL WEARING A TURBAN AND HOLDING A CANDLE.
259

ATTRIBUTED TO WOLFGANG HEIMBACH | YOUNG GIRL WEARING A TURBAN AND HOLDING A CANDLE

Estimate:

80,000

to
- 100,000 USD

Property of a Distinguished European Private Collection

ATTRIBUTED TO WOLFGANG HEIMBACH | YOUNG GIRL WEARING A TURBAN AND HOLDING A CANDLE

ATTRIBUTED TO WOLFGANG HEIMBACH | YOUNG GIRL WEARING A TURBAN AND HOLDING A CANDLE

Estimate:

80,000

to
- 100,000 USD

Lot sold:

212,500

USD

Property of a Distinguished European Private Collection

ATTRIBUTED TO WOLFGANG HEIMBACH

Ovelgönne circa 1615 - after 1678

YOUNG GIRL WEARING A TURBAN AND HOLDING A CANDLE


oil on canvas, in a painted oval

30⅜ by 24⅜ in.; 77.2 by 61.8 cm.

The following condition report has been provided by Simon Parkes of Simon Parkes Art Conservation, Inc. 502 East 74th St. New York, NY 212-734-3920, simonparkes@msn.com, an independent restorer who is not an employee of Sotheby's.


This work has a good lining which is nicely stabilizing the paint layer. The texture of the paint layer remains attractive. The painting is cleaned and varnished.


The retouches that have been applied are all visible under ultraviolet light. Small retouches can be found in areas of the background, with a concentration in the lower and center left. There are retouches in the back of the right hand. There are hardly any in the tunic and left hand. There are retouches in the upper center of the turban, but otherwise retouches are few here. A few small retouches have been added in the shadowed upper part of the face.


There are retouches throughout the neck, in the right side of the illuminated section of the lower face, a spot in the chin and another in the cheek on the left.


The retouches are carefully applied, and the work should be hung as is.


"This lot is offered for sale subject to Sotheby's Conditions of Business, which are available on request and printed in Sotheby's sale catalogues. The independent reports contained in this document are provided for prospective bidders' information only and without warranty by Sotheby's or the Seller."

Anonymous sale, Milan, Christie's, 29 November 2006, lot 20 (as Adam de Coster);

Where acquired by Luigi Koelliker, London;

By whom sold, (Property from the London Residence of Luigi Koelliker), London, Sotheby's, 4 December 2008, lot 131;

There acquired for $108,245.

C. Wright, French, Dutch and Flemish Caravaggesque Paintings from the Koelliker Collection, exhibition catalogue, London 2007, p. 36, cat. no 10, reproduced in color front cover, frontispiece, and p. 37;

V.I. Stoichita, S. Wuhrmann, and A. Couvreur, eds., Ombres, de la Renaissance à nos jours, Lausanne 2019, exhibition catalogue, pp. 55, 211, cat. no. 24, reproduced in color p. 55.

London, Robilant + Voena, Dutch and Flemish Caravaggesque Paintings from the Koelliker Collection, 28 November - 19 December 2007, no. 10;

Lausanne, Fondation de l'Hermitage, Ombres, de la Renaissance à nos jours, 28 June - 27 October 2019, no. 24.

Wolfgang Heimbach was a deaf and mute painter who was sent to train in the Netherlands and there came under the influence of Dutch genre painters such as Dirck Hals and Pieter Codde. In around 1640, Heimbach travelled south to Italy where he remained until 1651 and enjoyed the patronage of the Pamphilj and Medici families. From 1653 to 1662/63, he served as court painter to King Frederick III of Denmark-Norway, and from 1670 until his death he was in the service of the Prince Bishop of Münster.


The present painting probably dates from the artist's time in Italy, during which period he began to achieve a dramatic impact with chiaroscuro in his paintings. Christopher Wright (see Literature) has endorsed the attribution to Heimbach and has compared the present work to other night scenes by the artist, in which single figures shield the flame of their lamps with their hand, casting a distinctive shadow upwards onto their faces; see, in particular, the Young girl with an oil lamp and the Young man with an oil lamp, both in the Galleria Doria-Pamphili in Rome.1


1. See B. Nicolson, Caravaggism in Europe, vol. I, Turin 1989, p. 121, reproduced vol. III, pls. 1609 & 1610.