AVIGDOR ARIKHA | SAINT EMILION
AVIGDOR ARIKHA | SAINT EMILION
AVIGDOR ARIKHA | SAINT EMILION
45

AVIGDOR ARIKHA | SAINT EMILION

Estimate: 60,000 - 80,000 USD

AVIGDOR ARIKHA | SAINT EMILION

Estimate: 60,000 - 80,000 USD

Lot Details

Description

AVIGDOR ARIKHA

Israeli

b. 1929

SAINT EMILION


signed Arikha and signed in Hebrew (upper right); dated 24 VII 97 (on the reverse)

painted in 1997

oil on canvas

26 by 39½ in.

66 by 100 cm.

Condition Report

This work is in very good condition. Original canvas. No retouching apparent when viewed under UV light.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Cataloguing

Provenance

Sale: Sotheby's New York, March 18, 2004, lot 56

Purchased from the above by the present owner

Catalogue Note

From the mid 1960s, Arikha gave up abstract painting in favor of painting directly from life. He executed each work in front of the subject and always completed it in one sitting. Called “one of the best painters from life in the last decades of the 20th century,” (The Economist, Avigdor Arikha, 13 May 2010) "Arikha was intent on conveying, through the quivering presence of each brush-stroke, a palpably physical sensation of stillness and the comforting warmth of light.” (David Britt, ed., Modern Art: Impressionism to Post-Modernism, 1989, p. 154). His deliberate use of time, subject and treatment “brings haunting moments of insight and... gives the object an understated and suggestive dignity.” (Charles Jencks, Post-Modernism: The New Classicism in Art and Architecture, 1987, p. 154). Arikha's subjects – whether self portraits, intimate interiors of his Paris flat, or still lives of objects such as the Saint Emilion wine poured for two depicted here – reveal a deep reverence for the physical world without unnecessary embellishment. His paintings are intimate windows into the artist's life, fragments that he has detached from his everyday world, depicted with an intensity that can not but reach out to every viewer.

Israeli and International Art
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