Irish Art
Lot 89
RITA DUFFY | CAILLEACH
RITA DUFFY | CAILLEACH
89

RITA DUFFY | CAILLEACH

Estimate: 8,000 - 12,000 GBP

RITA DUFFY | CAILLEACH

Estimate: 8,000 - 12,000 GBP

Lot Details

Description

RITA DUFFY

b.1959

CAILLEACH


signed l.r.; titled and dated 2016 on the reverse

oil on linen

142 by 101.5cm., 56 by 40in.

Condition Report

Original canvas. The work appears in excellent overall condition ready to hang.


No signs of retouching under ultraviolet light.


Held in a simple wood frame.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

'Inspired by Irish mythology, the present work is an image rich in magic and memories of listening to my father tell ‘out of the mouth’ stories. Cailleach - 'old woman' or 'hag' in Irish comes from the Old Gaelic, meaning 'veiled one'. A sorceress and charm-worker, she was a powerful figure in my childhood imagination. I met her on several occasions, from the girlhood narratives of Snow White, with red apples and romance to the ancient images of powerful Sheela na Gigs. No wise Irish woman ever underestimates her powers of intuition.


Folklore has it that the first farmer to finish the grain harvest made a corn doll representing the Cailleach from the last sheaf of the crop, becoming the responsibility of the last farmer to finish harvesting, with the implication they would have to feed and house the hag all winter.' 


Rita Duffy

Irish Art
Online bidding closed