A PAIR OF IMARI DISHES, EDO PERIOD, 18TH CENTURY
A PAIR OF IMARI DISHES, EDO PERIOD, 18TH CENTURY
A PAIR OF IMARI DISHES, EDO PERIOD, 18TH CENTURY
A PAIR OF IMARI DISHES, EDO PERIOD, 18TH CENTURY
108

A PAIR OF IMARI DISHES, EDO PERIOD, 18TH CENTURY

Estimate: 5,000 - 8,000 GBP

A PAIR OF IMARI DISHES, EDO PERIOD, 18TH CENTURY

Estimate: 5,000 - 8,000 GBP

Lot Details

Description

A PAIR OF IMARI DISHES, EDO PERIOD, 18TH CENTURY


the shallow dishes with wide rim, decorated with the design known as "La Dame au Parasol", the central roundel with two bijin, one beneath a parasol beside birds and reeds, the rim with panels of birds and bijin

(2)

27 cm., 10½ in. diam.

Condition Report

- Good condition minor wear to the gilt.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

Cornelius Pronk (1691–1759) was a Dutch draftsman and porcelain designer who became a pupil of Jan van Houten and Arnold Boomen. He was commissioned by the Dutch East India Company to make a series of designs to decorate ceramics. The first drawing was in 1734, received in Batavia in 1735. This was the only known design to be produced both in Japanese and Chinese ceramics and became known as "La Dame au Parasol". In sending the drawings to Japan, Volker records "we are pleased that your Honours have had the drawings of porcelains sent from this country presented to the Japanese factors in order to test out whether the same can be made in Japan conforming with the drawings (...)".1 However, it did not prove possible to agree a reasonable price with the Japanese potters and no orders were placed. In 1740, the merchants abandoned their attempts on orders of the Dutch East India directors. A small number of pieces were made in Japan including plates of the size in this lot. 1


1 T. Volker, The Japanese Porcelain Trade of the Dutch East India Company after 1683, (Leiden, 1959), p. 78-81.


For a similar example see Soame Jenyns, Japanese Porcelain, (London, 1965), pl. 46A.

Fine Japanese Art
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