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View full screen - View 1 of Lot 176. JEAN DUBUFFET | I. HOMME PORTANT UN INSTRUMENT II. PERSONNAGE III. PERSONNAGE [3 WORKS].

Property from William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation

JEAN DUBUFFET | I. HOMME PORTANT UN INSTRUMENT II. PERSONNAGE III. PERSONNAGE [3 WORKS]

Lot Closed

December 6, 06:14 PM GMT

Estimate

30,000 - 40,000 USD

Lot Details

Description

Property from William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation

JEAN DUBUFFET

1901 - 1985

I. HOMME PORTANT UN INSTRUMENT

II. PERSONNAGE

III. PERSONNAGE

[3 WORKS]


i. signed with the artist's initials and dated 65; dated 15/4/65 on the reverse

ii. signed with the artist's initials and dated 65; dated 9/5/65 on the reverse

iii. signed with the artist's initials and dated 66


i. crayon on paper

ii. & iii. felt-tip pen on paper


Each sheet: 10⅝ by 8¼ in. (27 by 21 cm.)

Overall framed: 17⅜ by 33¾ in. (44.1 by 85.7 cm.)

i. William Louis-Dreyfus, Mount Kisco, New York (acquired in 1993)

The William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation (gift of the above in 2016)


ii. & iii. William Louis-Dreyfus, Mount Kisco, New York (acquired in 1966)

The William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation (gift of the above in 2016)

i. Max Loreau, Ed., Catalogue des travaux de Jean Dubuffet: Fascicule XXI, L'Hourloupe II, Lausanne 1968, cat. no. 119, p. 68, illustrated

ii. Max Loreau, Ed., Catalogue des travaux de Jean Dubuffet: Fascicule XXI, L'Hourloupe II, Lausanne 1968, cat. no. 132, p. 78, illustrated

iii. Max Loreau, Ed., Catalogue des travaux de Jean Dubuffet: Fascicule XXI, L'Hourloupe II, Lausanne 1968, cat. no. 243, p. 141, illustrated

“In September 1964, Dubuffet returns to his personnages and sites which are more mental and imaginary. …Nevertheless, to have gone through the ordeal of objects, tools, and houses, the appearance [of these subjects] took a new turn. The pieces of the game have become more massive and rough; arriving from composite mechanics of sorts from another time: that is, the Stone Age and its irrationality all at once… Moreover, these beings are made of what becomes more numerous and smaller parts, which is from this point on impossible to identify to a single member. So as to ensure a general economy in the painting, the relationship which links the anatomical constitution of the personnage to the site begins to change. Man begins to be provided with a distinct individuality: now more agitated than the landscape, more obsolete and more nervous too, but above all, more delusional.”


(Max Loreau, Catalogue des travaux de Jean Dubuffet: Fascicule XXI, L'Hourloupe II, Lausanne 1968, p. 7)