A MUGHAL CUT-MOSAIC POTTERY TILE PANEL, NORTH INDIA/PAKISTAN, 17TH CENTURY
A MUGHAL CUT-MOSAIC POTTERY TILE PANEL, NORTH INDIA/PAKISTAN, 17TH CENTURY
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A MUGHAL CUT-MOSAIC POTTERY TILE PANEL, NORTH INDIA/PAKISTAN, 17TH CENTURY

Estimate: 15,000 - 25,000 GBP

A MUGHAL CUT-MOSAIC POTTERY TILE PANEL, NORTH INDIA/PAKISTAN, 17TH CENTURY

Estimate: 15,000 - 25,000 GBP

Lot Details

Description

A MUGHAL CUT-MOSAIC POTTERY TILE PANEL, NORTH INDIA/PAKISTAN, 17TH CENTURY


the mosaic tiles fitted together forming a floral stem within a lobed arch, with cobalt blue, light blue, green, burgundy, orange and white glazes, mounted in metal frame for display


tile panel: 50 by 36cm.

63cm. height with stand.

Condition Report

The tile panel with some surface chips, minor sections missing, abrasion to extremities particularly, hairline cracks, few minor old restorations, set in frame - loose, please consult a professional restorer about further conservation of this piece, as viewed.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

Similar floral cut-tile mosaic niches can be found in Lahore Fort in Pakistan, completed in 1631 (Degorge and Porter 2002, p.263) and in the mosque of Wazir Khan, also in Lahore completed three years later which has been described as ‘undoubtedly the richest Mughal monument in terms of ceramic decoration’ (ibid., pp.260-1).

Arts of the Islamic World
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