1267
JUMP TO LOT
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The History of Now: The Important American Folk Art Collection of David Teiger | Sold to Benefit Teiger Foundation for the Support of Contemporary Art

|
New York

Angel Gabriel
American School, 19th century
cut and braced sheet iron and cast-zinc weathervane with traces of polychrome
Height 30 in. by Length 50 1/4 in.
circa 1825
found in Hammond, New York
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Provenance

Joel and Kate Kopp, America Hurrah, New York.

Literature

Robert Bishop and Patricia Coblenz, A Gallery of American Weathervanes and Whirligigs (New York: E.P. Dutton, 1981) p. 81;
Tom Geismar and Harvey Kahn, Spiritually Moving: A Collection of American Folk Art Sculpture (New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1998) cat. no. 61, illus. in color.

Catalogue Note

The Archangel Gabriel is best known as the New Testament's angel of the Annunciation, sent by God to tell Mary that she would give birth to Jesus, as recorded in the Gospel of Luke. While he is not described as a trumpeter in the Bible, the fourteenth-century English theologian John Wycliffe first identified him as the trumpeter who would announce the Lord's return to earth, and that association went on to become part of Christian tradition.

Weathervanes representing a trumpeting Gabriel became popular symbols on rural churches during the great religious revivals that swept America in the early decades of the republic. Like this example, most were individual efforts fashioned from sheet metal by local smithies.

Hammond, where this vane was found and possibly made, is a small town in upstate New York that borders the St. Lawrence River and the 1000 Islands region. The first church in what became Hammond was built in 1822.

The History of Now: The Important American Folk Art Collection of David Teiger | Sold to Benefit Teiger Foundation for the Support of Contemporary Art

|
New York