1260
JUMP TO LOT
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The History of Now: The Important American Folk Art Collection of David Teiger | Sold to Benefit Teiger Foundation for the Support of Contemporary Art

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New York

Hudsonian Curlew (Whimbrel)
Thomas Gelston
(1851-1923)
having raised wing detail
polychromed cedar decoy with oak bill and glass eyes
Height 18 in. by Length 14 in.
circa 1900
Quogue, New York
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Provenance

Bud Ward, Oceanside, New York;
Steve Miller, American Folk Art, New York.

Literature

William J. Mackey, Jr., American Bird Decoys, (Exton, Pennsylvania: Schiffer Publishing, 1965) pp. 98-99, pl. 2;
Robert Bishop, American Folk Sculpture, (E.P. Dutton, New York, 1974) pl. 558, p. 301;
Tom Geismar and Harvey Kahn, Spiritually Moving:  A Collection of American Folk Art Sculpture (New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1998) cat. no. 46, illus. in color.

Catalogue Note

Thomas Gelston was a sportsman who carved decoys of a number of duck and shorebird species. His elegant long-billed and Hudsonian curlews are the most sought-after pieces of his work today. The Hudsonian curlew, or whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus), is the most common American curlew species, a big plump-breasted bird that was prized by nineteenth and early twentieth-century market hunters, restauranteurs, and diners. American whimbrels are long-distance migrators that breed in the Arctic and winter in South America, sometimes covering as much as 2,500 miles in a single, nonstop flight. 

The History of Now: The Important American Folk Art Collection of David Teiger | Sold to Benefit Teiger Foundation for the Support of Contemporary Art

|
New York