138
138
Patek Philippe & Co., Genève
AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE AND RARE GOLD OPEN-FACED QUARTER REPEATING KEYLESS LEVER MONTRE À TACT WITH ECCENTRIC SECONDS 1861, NO. 19.850
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138
Patek Philippe & Co., Genève
AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE AND RARE GOLD OPEN-FACED QUARTER REPEATING KEYLESS LEVER MONTRE À TACT WITH ECCENTRIC SECONDS 1861, NO. 19.850
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Details & Cataloguing

Masterworks of Time: Adolf Lange, The Golden Era of Glashütte

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Geneva

Patek Philippe & Co., Genève
AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE AND RARE GOLD OPEN-FACED QUARTER REPEATING KEYLESS LEVER MONTRE À TACT WITH ECCENTRIC SECONDS 1861, NO. 19.850
Movement: 20''' gilded, lever escapement, wolf's tooth winding, bi-metallic compensation balance, two steel hammers striking coiled gongs
Dial: white enamel, Roman numerals, outer Arabic minute ring, eccentric seconds between 5 and 6 o'clock
Case: 18ct gold, the back cover highly engraved with a lion and unicorn supporting a central cartouche with crest depicting an eagle, all beneath a crown and with medals to the base of the scene, the arms under a coronet of a Marquess with suspended military orders, the back mounted with decoratively engraved tact hand, back bezel engraved with touch pins, slide repeat to the band, polished gold cuvette with central aperture to connect tact mechanism to the rear-mounted hand, cuvette signed and numbered Invention & Exécution de Patek Philippe and Co., à Genève, No.19850
diameter 52mm
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Provenance

Captain Peter Belin
Sotheby's London, The Belin Collection, 29 November 1979, lot 187

Catalogue Note

Accompanied by an Extract from the Archives confirming production in 1861 and sale on 23 May 1862. The Extract further confirms the watch as a montre à tact together with the engraving of the Unicorn and Lion to the case.

Designed so that the time could be determined by touch, Patek produced montre à tact watches from 1845 and introduced them to the public at the 1851 London Universal Exhibition. Patek Philippe produced a small number of watches with the 'tact' system from c. 1845 and examples were exhibited at the Universal Exhibition in 1851 (see: Patek Philippe Museum, Patek Philippe Watches, Vol. 1, p.70). The pointer affixed to the outside case back can be rotated in a clockwise direction by the user until it is halted by the watch's 'à tact' mechanism, a series of touch pins arranged at half hourly intervals around the bezel of the case back allow the time to be read. In the present watch, the addition of quarter repetition also allows a more precise determination of the time, still without the necessity of viewing the watch's dial.

The Arms are stated to probably be Vogl of Bavaria, ennobled on 4 May, 1763.

For another montre à tact by Patek, movement no. 51267, see Peter Friess, Patek Philippe Museum Emergence of the Portable Watch, Vol I, p. 70.

Masterworks of Time: Adolf Lange, The Golden Era of Glashütte

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Geneva