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Details & Cataloguing

Masterworks of Time: Adolf Lange, The Golden Era of Glashütte

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Geneva

A. Lange & Söhne, Glashütte
A VERY FINE GOLD HUNTING CASED QUARTER REPEATING KEYLESS LEVER CHRONOGRAPH WATCH WITH REGISTER 1917, NO. 81693
Movement: 1a quality, cal. 43 gilded ¾ plate, gold lever, bi-metallic compensation balance, 42 jewels, ruby endstone, two polished steel hammers repeating on coiled gongs, polished steel chronograph bridge work mounted to a matt finished steel asymmetrical bridge and all visible to the gilded backplate, signed and numbered A. Lange & Söhne, Glashütte, Dresden, 81693
Dial: white enamel dial with sunken centre, Arabic numerals, twin outer tracks for minutes and chronograph seconds with red Arabic numeral 5-minute divisions, two recessed subsidiary dials for constant seconds and 30-minute register, gold Louis XV style hands, signed A. Lange & Söhne, Glashütte I/SA 
Case: "Royal" 18ct gold, plain polished covers, plain polished gold cuvette, setting lever for hand-set beneath bezel below 4 o'clock, front and back covers signed A. Lange & Söhne, Glashütte, the covers and cuvette numbered 81693    
diameter 58.5mm
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Literature

Martin Huber, Die Uhren von A. Lange & Söhne, Glashütte, Sachsen, 1988, p.178, table 48
Martin Huber, Die Lange Liste, 2000, pp. 190-191

Catalogue Note

Accompanied by a certificate of origin from the Deutsches Uhrenmuseum, Glashütte confirming the date of sale on 22nd January 1917 to H. Schrader, Hamburg for 1,738.-M. 

The present lot is one of an approximate 43 examples of a quarter repeating chronograph watches with or without a minute counter,  see Martin Huber, Die Lange Liste, 2000, pp. 190-191

Lange replaced the jumping seconds mechanism with a chronograph in their basic quarter repeaters starting in 1880.  They built approximately 65 quarter repeating chronographs until 1941.  These differed from normal chronographs in that the chronograph function was now driven by a transmission wheel geared to the seconds wheel under the dial, as opposed to a wheel on the arbor of the fourth-wheel.  The user could then engage the chronograph by "rocking" the separate transition-wheel.  This construction lowered the amount of chronograph wheels needed from three to two, and neutralized the tendency of chronographs to jump forwards or back.

Masterworks of Time: Adolf Lange, The Golden Era of Glashütte

|
Geneva