100
100
Albert G. Piguet, Le Sentier
AN EXTREMELY RARE AND VERY FINE OPEN-FACED KEYLESS WATCH BASED ON THE PRINCIPLES OF RESONANCE WITH DOUBLE LEVER ESCAPEMENT AND TWO GUILLAUME BALANCES, IN ASSOCIATED GOLD CASE WITH EXHIBITION BACK MOVEMENT 1933, NO.220, CASE 1970S
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100
Albert G. Piguet, Le Sentier
AN EXTREMELY RARE AND VERY FINE OPEN-FACED KEYLESS WATCH BASED ON THE PRINCIPLES OF RESONANCE WITH DOUBLE LEVER ESCAPEMENT AND TWO GUILLAUME BALANCES, IN ASSOCIATED GOLD CASE WITH EXHIBITION BACK MOVEMENT 1933, NO.220, CASE 1970S
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Details & Cataloguing

Masterworks of Time: Adolf Lange, The Golden Era of Glashütte

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Geneva

Albert G. Piguet, Le Sentier
AN EXTREMELY RARE AND VERY FINE OPEN-FACED KEYLESS WATCH BASED ON THE PRINCIPLES OF RESONANCE WITH DOUBLE LEVER ESCAPEMENT AND TWO GUILLAUME BALANCES, IN ASSOCIATED GOLD CASE WITH EXHIBITION BACK MOVEMENT 1933, NO.220, CASE 1970S
Movement: damascened, single train with differential gearing releasing power to the double lever escapement, two Guillaume balance each with swan-neck precision regulation, 29 jewels, signed Albert G. Piguet, Le Sentier, 1933 
Dial: white enamel, Roman numerals, outer minute ring, sunken subsidiary seconds, blued steel hands
Case: later purpose-built gold case with glazed back
diameter 49mm
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Provenance

Galerie d'Horlogerie Ancienne, IX, 15 October 1978, lot 248
Antiquorum Geneva, 18-19 April 1998, lot 611 (also illustrated on back cover).

Literature

Horological Journal, Feb 1998 and May 1998 (cover image) and page 145.

Catalogue Note

Albert Piguet (1914-2000) studied at the École d'Horlogerie in the Valée de Joux between 1930 and 1934. A highly gifted pupil, the present watch was executed as an exhibition 'Masterpiece' in 1933, prior to Piguet's graduation. According to an article in the Horological Journal (May 1998, p.145) a total of six watch movements similar to the present were executed between 1932 and 1934 under the supervision of the school's director Marcel Builleumier. 

Abraham-Louis Breguet was the first to discover the principles of 'resonance'. Breguet's resonance watches introduced two independent movements within the same case and in so doing, Breguet was able to demonstrate that the balances became regulated by the 'resonance' phenomenon, oscillating exactly in step with one other. Rather than using two movements, the present watch uses a single train but with twin guillaume balances, escape wheels and differential gearing - the differential wheel distributes the power from the train to the two escapements.

According to research conducted at the time of the watch's sale at Antiquorum in 1998, which included interviews with Albert Piguet himself, the movement was originally placed in a glazed nickel case of the type usually prepared for observatory contests or exhibition purposes. In the 1970s, the movement was finally cased in gold so that it might be sold.

An exceptional watchmaker, following the completion of his studies at the École d'Horlogerie, Albert Piguet was offered a job at the specialist chronograph manufacturer Lemania. He is perhaps best known for his development of the Lemania calibre CH27 C12 in 1946. At that time, Omega and Lemania were both part of the SSIH and the calibre would later become the legendary Omega calibre 321 as used in the Omega Speedmaster - the first watch on the moon. Albert Piguet developed a number of calibres for Lemania and was the firm's technical director between 1948 and 1980.

Masterworks of Time: Adolf Lange, The Golden Era of Glashütte

|
Geneva