144
144

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

Gustave Loiseau
BORDS DE L'EURE
JUMP TO LOT
144

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

Gustave Loiseau
BORDS DE L'EURE
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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London

Gustave Loiseau
1865 - 1935
BORDS DE L'EURE
stamped G. Loiseau (lower right)
oil on canvas
65 by 81cm., 25 5/8 by 32in.
Painted in 1901.
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This work will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné being prepared by Didier Imbert.

Provenance

Estate of the Artist
Durand-Ruel, Paris
Arthur Tooth & Sons, London
Private Collection, New York (sale: Christie's, New York, 11th May 1989, lot 274)
Private Collection, Japan (sale: Sotheby's, New York, 14th May 1998, lot 158)
Private Collection, Texas (purchased at the above sale; sale: Christie's, New York, 13th November 2015, lot 1388)
Purchased at the above sale by the present owner

Catalogue Note

Loiseau received a small inheritance from his grandmother upon her death in 1887, which enabled him to leave Paris, cease his career as a decorator, and focus his attention full-time on painting. Loiseau was self-taught, looking to his Impressionist peers for inspiration, but honing his practice through observation and an acute sensibility. Indeed, his mature style, as exemplified in the present work, was fully his own. Following the dealer Paul Durand-Ruel’s discovery of Loiseau’s work in 1897 and an ensuing contract, the artist achieved financial independence.

The reflection of trees upon a body of water was a motif frequently explored by the Impressionists. The River Eure referenced in the present work is situated in northwestern France, with its source in Normandy. Here, Loiseau adeptly conveys the shimmer of the trees’ reflection in a singular moment. This work’s rich surface, composed of spontaneous brushwork and areas of thickly applied paint, exemplifies the artist's instinctive use of Impressionist and Neo-Impressionist techniques which he derived from his close relationship with Claude Monet. Loiseau seemingly preferred the atmospheric light of dawn or dusk to high noon, as depicted in the present work. In Bords de l’Eure, Loiseau eliminates almost every sign of human presence, choosing instead to focus on the extraordinarily dramatic possibilities of nature.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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London