3692
3692

PROPERTY FROM THE MUYUTANG COLLECTION

A LONG HUANGHUALI TABLE, QIAOTOUAN
LATE MING – EARLY QING DYNASTY
JUMP TO LOT
3692

PROPERTY FROM THE MUYUTANG COLLECTION

A LONG HUANGHUALI TABLE, QIAOTOUAN
LATE MING – EARLY QING DYNASTY
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong

A LONG HUANGHUALI TABLE, QIAOTOUAN
LATE MING – EARLY QING DYNASTY
the top of a single-board floating panel tongue-and-grooved to the frame with shaped everted flanges, the edge of the frame gently moulding downward, above a beaded apron with carved archaistic dragons, all supported on round legs joined by double stretchers
84.5 by 156 by 40.5 cm, 33 1/4  by 61 3/8  by 15 7/8  in.
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Catalogue Note

One of the most enduring and successful design in classical Chinese furniture, qiaotouan are celebrated for their elegant and yet sturdy form. While the table top of the present piece was made from a single plank of huanghuali, a sense of lightness is captured through the sinuous movements of the dragons on the aprons, and the upturned ends. The latter heighten its presence, while also serving the function of concealing the end grains of the top plank.  

Tables of this design derive from altar tables, zu, that were used to hold meat offerings from as early as the Eastern Zhou dynasty (771-256 BC). Rectangular tables with upturned ends are depicted on archaic bronze yi vessels from this period, and a low lacquered table with upturned flanges, unearthed from a tomb in Zhaoxiang, Hubei province, and attributed to the Spring and Autumn period (722-481 BC), is illustrated in Sarah Handler, ‘Side Tables. A Surface for Treasures and the Gods’, Chinese Furniture. Selected Articles from Orientations1984-1999, Hong Kong, 1999, p. 200. 

A table of similar proportions but lacking the carved dragons on the aprons, was sold in our New York rooms, 9th/10th October 1987, lot 454; and another from the collection of Philip Wood, was sold at Christie’s New York, 15th September 2011, lot 1333. 

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong