3648
3648

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

A RARE CORAL-GROUND FAMILLE-VERTE 'FLORAL' BOWL
YUZHI MARK AND PERIOD OF KANGXI
Estimate
2,800,0003,200,000
JUMP TO LOT
3648

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

A RARE CORAL-GROUND FAMILLE-VERTE 'FLORAL' BOWL
YUZHI MARK AND PERIOD OF KANGXI
Estimate
2,800,0003,200,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong

A RARE CORAL-GROUND FAMILLE-VERTE 'FLORAL' BOWL
YUZHI MARK AND PERIOD OF KANGXI
finely potted with deep rounded sides rising from a short slightly splayed foot to a gently flaring rim, the exterior vibrantly decorated with nine lush autumn-flowering buds and blooms, including peony, chrysanthemum, poppy and crabapple, the luscious blooms rendered borne on and growing amidst curling stems and verdant foliage, all picked out in shaded tones of blue, pale yellow, green and iron-red against a rich coral-red ground, the base inscribed in underglaze blue with a four-character yuzhi mark within a double square
10.9 cm, 4 1/4  in.
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Provenance

Acquired at L'Hotel des Ventes, Geneva in the early 1970s.
A Parisian private collection.
Sotheby's Hong Kong, 5th October 2016, lot 108.

Catalogue Note

This bowl belongs to a small group of wares adorned with vibrantly coloured designs over a dark-coloured ground, and with yuzhi reign ('made for imperial use of ...') marks. These are rare and suggest a closer relationship to the imperial court. Wares enamelled in the imperial workshops in the Forbidden City of Beijing rather than by the imperial kilns at Jingdezhen in Jiangxi province, bear such yuzhi marks, but in overglaze-blue or pink enamel, since the plain white porcelains came from Jingdezhen fully glazed and fired. The significance of the underglaze-blue yuzhi mark, which would have been added at Jingdezhen, has been much discussed, especially since identical bowls are also known with underglaze-blue nianzhi marks.

It has been suggested that such bowls were enamelled in the Palace in Beijing, with only the mark inscribed at Jingdezhen before firing. They seem, however, very different from the typical Kangxi porcelains from the Beijing palace workshops, and are part of a small but well-known range of pieces with the same design painted in the characteristic Jingdezhen wucai ('five colour') palette of the Kangxi period, which in the West is known as the famille-verte. It is therefore most likely that they were decorated in Jingdezhen, even if their marks may indicate direct use at the palace. Hugh Moss in By Imperial Command. An Introduction to Ch'ing Imperial Painted Enamels, Hong Kong, 1976, p. 82, discusses wares of this type and notes that until the craftsmen of Jingdezhen became acquainted with the newly developed famille-rose palette of the Palace Workshops, they continued to work in the dominant style of the Kangxi period.

Bowls of this type are held in important private and museum collections worldwide; a pair in the National Palace Museum, Taipei, is illustrated in Porcelain with Painted Enamels of Qing Yongzheng Period, Taipei, 2013, pl. 21; one in the Shanghai Museum, Shanghai, is published in Wang Qingzheng, Kangxi Porcelain wares from the Shanghai Museum Collection, Hong Kong, 1998, pl. 95; another in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, is illustrated in He Li, Chinese Ceramics. A New Standard Guide, London, 1996, pl. 653; a pair, from the Edward T. Chow collection and now in the S.C. Ko Tianminlou collection, included in the exhibition Chinese Porcelain. The S.C. Ko Tianminlou Collection, Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong, 1987, cat. no. 89, was sold in these rooms, 25th November 1980, lot 143; and another pair from the T.Y. Chao and Meiyintang collections, published in Regina Krahl, Chinese Ceramics from the Meiyintang Collection, vol. 4, London, 1994-2010, no. 1724, was sold several times at auction, most recently in these rooms, 7th April 2011, lot 4.

Similar bowls with Yongzheng yuzhi, Yongzheng nianzhi, as well as six-character Yongzheng and Qianlong reign marks are illustrated in The Tsui Museum of Art. Chinese Ceramics IV. Qing Dynasty, Hong Kong, 1995, pls. 158-60 and 166, together with a rare Palace Workshop example with a Kangxi yuzhi mark in puce enamel, pl. 123.

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong