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A pair of Louis XVI gilt-bronze mounted burr yew, ebony, amaranth and rosewood corner cupboards by Philippe Pasquier
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42
A pair of Louis XVI gilt-bronze mounted burr yew, ebony, amaranth and rosewood corner cupboards by Philippe Pasquier
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Details & Cataloguing

Excellence

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Paris

A pair of Louis XVI gilt-bronze mounted burr yew, ebony, amaranth and rosewood corner cupboards by Philippe Pasquier
the white marble top above the curved front with two doors opening, flanked by tapered pilasters, applied with gilt-bronze frames and capitals (regilt); (one marble top restored; the inside shelves added later)

Quantity: 2
Haut. 135 cm, larg. 96 cm, prof. 68 cm ; height 53 1/4 in; width 37 3/4 in; depth 26 3/4 in
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Catalogue Note

Few works by the cabinetmaker Philippe Pasquier remain today; he was received as master in 1760 and died in 1783. During Louis XVI's reign, his production was distinguished by a daring aesthetic choice using the very decorative appearance of the burr yew, recalling marble veining, and simply outlined by an ebony framing.

Stamped by the master, a fall-front secretary veneered with the same wood essences, whose interior was later decorated with gouache panels, was part of the collections of the 10th Duke of Hamilton in Scotland, then in those of J. Pierpont Morgan, before belonging to the Kress collection (consult J. Parker, Decorative Art from the Samuel H. Kress Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1964, exh. cat 16, pp. 95-100).
Also stamped, a small commode with two drawers with similar decor is kept in a private Paris collection.
The Prince Regent, the future George IV, bought in 1805 for Carlton House a fall-front secretary with a veneer of yew and ebony, the facade enriched with porcelain panels, which he transferred to Windsor Castle in 1827 and which is today attributed to Pasquier (consult, Hugh Roberts, For the King's pleasure: the furnishing and decoration of George IV's apartments at Windsor Castle, London, 2001, 217, fig. 256).
A large commode with a triple-sectioned facade, still attributed to our cabinetmaker, was auctioned at Christie's in New York, "Arts of France", on 21 October 1997, lot 237, then at Christie's in London, on 10 December 2009, lot 798. Lastly, P. Kjellberg cites a commode made of burr yew and ebony, which belonged to Charles de Beistegui at the Palazzo Labia in Venice (see, Le Mobilier français du XVIIIe siècle, Paris, 1989, 635).

Excellence

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Paris