37
37
A carved giltwood console table, Louis XVI
Estimate
50,00080,000
JUMP TO LOT
37
A carved giltwood console table, Louis XVI
Estimate
50,00080,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Excellence

|
Paris

A carved giltwood console table, Louis XVI
with a demi-lune grey veined marble top, above a frieze with a band of stylised pierced piastre, on female term supports suspending floral garlands terminating in acanthus carved scrolled supports joined by a stretcher centred by a flaming urn; (regilt)
Haut. 94 cm, larg. 102 cm, prof. 55 cm ; Height 3 ft 1 in.; Width 3 ft 6 1/4 in.; Deep 1 ft 7 in.
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Provenance

Collection Eugène Kraemer, sold Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 28 and 29 April 1913, lot 168
Sold Sotheby's, New York, 22 May 1997, lot 255
Sold Sotheby's, London, 8 July 2008, lot 245

Literature

S. de Ricci, Le style Louis XVI, Paris, 1913, p. 74 (ill.)
A. Keim, Die Kunststile des Louis XVI, 1929

Related literature:
T. Dell, Furniture in the Frick Collection, part. 2, Vermont, 1992, pp. 132-142
B. Langer and H. Ottomeyer, Die französischen Möbel des 18. Jahrhunderts, Munich, 1995, pp. 252-253
B. G. B. Pallot, Furniture Collections in the Louvre, vol. 2, Dijon, 1993, pp. 138-139

Catalogue Note

This console table is comparable to drawings executed by François-Joseph Duret (1729-1816), but also to several realisations with similar modeling, within the Turkish style that was very popular in the mid-1770s. For further discussion, see the pair of console tables from the hôtel des Deux-Ponts in Strasbourg, nowadays housed in the Munich Residenz (inv. Res. Mü. M134 and M135); the console table kept at the Louvre which was part of the collections of Charles-Claude de Flahaut de La Billarderie, comte d’Angiviller (1730-1809), Directeur General to the King's Buildings (inv. OA5165); the console table made around 1780 by Georges Jacob for the comte d’Artois’ Turkish cabinet at Versailles (inv. OA5234); and the pair of small console tables with Nubian figures housed at the Frick Collection (Dell, 135).

One of the first Turkish cabinets, showing the exoticism taste for a dreamlike Orient, was probably that of the comte d'Artois delivered around 1775 to Versailles. However, the most famous remains the one produced for Queen Marie-Antoinette at the château of Fontainebleau, designed in 1777 by Richard Mique and decorated by the Rousseau brothers.

Excellence

|
Paris