35
35
A Neoclassical taste gilt-bronze mounted amaranth, antic marbles and pietre dure table, probably Eastern Europe, 19th century, inserting two pietre dure panels, Florence, late 17th/early 18th century, and a Roman top, late 18th century
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 100,000 EUR
JUMP TO LOT
35
A Neoclassical taste gilt-bronze mounted amaranth, antic marbles and pietre dure table, probably Eastern Europe, 19th century, inserting two pietre dure panels, Florence, late 17th/early 18th century, and a Roman top, late 18th century
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 100,000 EUR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Excellence

|
Paris

A Neoclassical taste gilt-bronze mounted amaranth, antic marbles and pietre dure table, probably Eastern Europe, 19th century, inserting two pietre dure panels, Florence, late 17th/early 18th century, and a Roman top, late 18th century
the rectangular fiorito alabaster, verde antico and rosso antico top above a frieze opening with two drawers with pietre dure marquetry landscapes, on fluted and tapered legs; (two limewood elements replacing marble panels on one side)
Haut. 77,5 cm, larg. 84 cm, prof. 55 cm ; Height 28 in.; width 33 in.; 21 2/3 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

Related references:
S. Castelluccio, Les meubles de pierres dures de Louis XIV et l'atelier des Gobelins, Dijon, 2007, pp. 110-117
A. Giusti, Pietre dure. Hardstones in Furniture and Decorations, London, 1992, p. 32
A. Giusti and W. Koeppe, Art of the Royal Court. Treasures in Pietre Dure from the Palaces of Europe, New York, 2008, pp. 330-337
A. M. Massinelli, Hardstones, London, 2000, p. 47

Catalogue Note

This finely and skillfully executed table, comprising pietre dure panels of various origins and gilt-bronze probably Italian, is typical of what can be categorized as Grand Tour furniture.

This table recalls the craftsmanship of some French cabinetmakers such as Martin Carlin and Adam Weisweiler who took advantage of the sale and the dismantling of Italian and Gobelins furniture, as they were considered outdated. Then they used these artifacts to redecorate cabinets and commodes in the fashionable style during the mid-18th century and especially after the 1770s. Several decorative arts dealers including Claude Antoine Julliot, Simon Philippe Poirier, the Darnaults and Dominique Daguerre, were the instigators of these creations. An example is Martin Carlin's secretary with fall-front, circa 1780, from the Louvre (inv. OA 11176), which insets four panels with Florentine landscapes on the facade and two bouquets on the side panels. Akin to our table, one by Carlin from the former collection of the duc de Brissac bears a pietre dure top based on Aesop's Fables, two 17th century landscapes attributed to the Galleria dei Lavori of Florence with perched birds along the apron (château de Versailles, inv. VMB 13753).

The pietre dure panels present on the drawer front of our table are typical of this 17th century Florentine production, sold in particular to collectors traveling through Italy during their Grand Tour. Created in 1558 by the Grand Duke Ferdinand I of Medici, the Opificio delle pietre dure dominated this lapidary art and fascinated the whole of Europe before competitors like the Parisian Gobelins workshop was established after 1668. A Roman marble top and diamond shape lateral panels are also part of the table with these pietre dure panels.

Excellence

|
Paris