45
45
An illuminated book of prayers, copied by Ahmad al-Nayrizi, the illumination attributable to Muhammad Hadi, Persia, Safavid, dated 1132 AH/1719-20 AD
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 30,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
45
An illuminated book of prayers, copied by Ahmad al-Nayrizi, the illumination attributable to Muhammad Hadi, Persia, Safavid, dated 1132 AH/1719-20 AD
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 30,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arts of the Islamic World

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An illuminated book of prayers, copied by Ahmad al-Nayrizi, the illumination attributable to Muhammad Hadi, Persia, Safavid, dated 1132 AH/1719-20 AD
Arabic manuscript on paper, 39 leaves plus 4 fly-leaves, 7 lines to the page written in naskh in black ink with interlinear Persian translation in red nasta’liq, ruled in blue, red, green and gold, the margins with gold  interlacing flowers, headings written in red against a gold ground, f.1b and 2a with a fine carpet page decorated with gold nasta’liq against a blue ground within cartouches against a fine ground decorated with vine scrolls, in green leather binding with gilt decoration
21.5 by 12.8cm.
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Catalogue Note

Ahmad al-Nayrizi was one of the most prolific calligraphers of the Safavid period. Born in Nayriz in Fars, he studied calligraphy under Muhammad Ibrahim ibn Muhammad Nasir Qumi, also known as Aqa Ibrahim Qumi (active between 1659 and 1707). Al-Nayrizi later moved to Isfahan and became the court calligrapher during the reign of Shah Sultan Husayn (r.1694-1722).

The lavish carpet page with a dense pattern of interlacing vine scrolls is almost identical to that found in a prayer book dated 1132 AH/1719 AD in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (inv. no.2003.239 ), attributed to Muhammad Hadi.

Muhammad Hadi (d.ca. 1771) was one of the most famous illuminators of the Safavid period, responsible for the borders of the St Petersburg muraqqa' (for a note on the album see lot 94). The motif of fruit-bearing vine scrolls is typical of the region of Kashmir and found in several media, from lacquer to metalwork. Muhammad Hadi’s master, ‘Ali Ashraf, used it often in his work (see for example a lacquer mirror case now in the National Museum of Scotland decorated with a similar scrolls (Ekhtiar 2011, p.274).

Arts of the Islamic World

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London