24
24
An illuminated genealogical scroll, Turkey, Karakaya, Ottoman, dated 838 AH/1434 AD
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 5,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
24
An illuminated genealogical scroll, Turkey, Karakaya, Ottoman, dated 838 AH/1434 AD
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 5,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arts of the Islamic World

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London

An illuminated genealogical scroll, Turkey, Karakaya, Ottoman, dated 838 AH/1434 AD
Arabic and Ottoman Turkish manuscript on paper backed on green linen, written in naskh and thuluth scripts in black ink
277 by 16cm.
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Catalogue Note

The present scroll represents a genealogy starting with Ibn ‘Umar going back to Imam ‘Ali and giving the name of the place where the text was written as the village of Kaduk (?) (possibly a former name of Karakaya). Then follows the spiritual lineage of Muslih al-Din going back to Abu Bakr, through Abu Hafs ‘Umar al-Suhrawardi. Therearfter various Suhrawardi spiritual lineages are given mentioning such figures as Junayd al-Baghdadi, Abu Hanifa and Imam ‘Ali through the Shi‘i Imams. This is followed by a genealogy of the Prophet Muhammad back to the Prophet Adam, various traditions of the Prophet, Imam ‘Ali and various hadith qudsi (extra-Qur’anic sayings attributed to God), a text in which Shaykh Muslih al-Din awards Ibn ‘Umar with the khirqa (Sufi cloak) and shajara (spiritual lineage) and various texts on the duties of the Sufi shaykh.

Witnesses at the bottom of the scroll are named as Jalal al-Din known as al-Qaysari, and a certain Ahmad ibn ‘Uthman al-Qaysari.

A note at the end records that the ijazeh was awarded by a certain Muslih al-Din to his eldest son, a certain Sayyid ibn ‘Umar Pasha ibn Awliya’ Pasha (Evliya Pasha) ibn al-Shaykh ‘Isa ibn al-Sayyid Khalil. This identifies him as coming from the line of a certain Sayyid Khalil (Seyyid Halil), whose tomb and lodge (zaviye) in Karakaya in the Kayseri region was endowed by his son Shaykh ‘Isa in 756 AH/1355-56 AD in the time of the Eretnid Beylicate.

Arts of the Islamic World

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London