18
18
An illuminated Qur’an juz (IX), Egypt, Mamluk, second half 14th century
Estimate
6,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT
18
An illuminated Qur’an juz (IX), Egypt, Mamluk, second half 14th century
Estimate
6,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arts of the Islamic World

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London

An illuminated Qur’an juz (IX), Egypt, Mamluk, second half 14th century
surah al-A’raf (VII), beginning of v.88 to surah al-anfal (VIII) end of v.40
Arabic manuscript on polished paper, 35 leaves, 7 lines to the page written in naskh in black ink, verses separated by gold and polychrome rosettes, f.1b with an illuminated blue and red headpiece, f.26b with surah heading written in gold outlined in black, in a contemporaneous stamped leather binding, with flap
26.5 by 17cm.
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Catalogue Note

A juz' from a thirty-volume set in a comparable script and with similar illuminated features (employing a similar palette of contrasting god and coppery red), can be found in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, (arabe 5844). It was endowed by Sultan Barquq (r. 1382-99) to a khanqah or Sufi hospice (see exhib. cat. L'art du Livre Arabe du Manuscrit au Livre d'Artiste (Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, 2002, no.45, p.46). A further comparable volume of the same date is in the Chester Beatty Library, 1493, illustrated in Elaine Wright, Islam: Faith, Art, Culture. Manuscripts of the Chester Beatty Library, London 2009, p.112, fig.75.

Likely to have been later associated with the juz, this binding is a fine example of Mamluk production of the fourteenth/fifteenth century. The flap and upper board come from the same original binding, while the lower board is from another example of the same period. Both covers are decorated by a central stamped medallion with interlacing geometrical patterns, the edges of the flap and upper cover consisting of a running pattern of impressions of 's-shaped' scrolls, very similar to those found on two bindings now in the Oriental Institute in Chicago (inv. no.A12144 and A12167, Bosch 1981, p.123, .and p.128, no.33), respectively attributed to Egypt and Saudi Arabia and dated to the fifteenth century.

Arts of the Islamic World

|
London