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78

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, SOUTH OF FRANCE

Gustave-Adolphe Mossa
THE IRONY OF SALOME
JUMP TO LOT
78

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, SOUTH OF FRANCE

Gustave-Adolphe Mossa
THE IRONY OF SALOME
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Œuvres sur Papier

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Paris

Gustave-Adolphe Mossa
NICE 1883 - 1971 NICE
THE IRONY OF SALOME
Signed and dated center left Gustav Adolf Mossa / Niciensis pinxit MCMIV ; titled lower right

Watercolor and black pencil on paper
65,5 x 45cm
25 3/4  by 18 3/4  in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Mossa Succession, 1972
Françoise and Charles Mossa Collection
Galerie de Francony, Nice
Purchased from the above by the current owners in the 1960s or 1970s

Exhibited

Gustav Adolf Mossa, L'Eclaireur de Nice, Nice, January 31st - February 5th 1905, n°4

Literature

Jean-Roger Soubiran, Les Aquarelles symbolistes et la création plastique symboliste de Gustav Adolf Mossa, Doctorat Thesis, Université d'Aix-en-Provence - Marseille, 1978, illustrated p. 453-454, n°47
Jean-Roger Soubiran, Gustav Adolf Mossa, Nice, 1985, illustrated p. 189, n°260
Jean-Roger Soubiran, Gustav Adolf Mossa, Catalogue raisonné des oeuvres "symbolistes", Paris, 2010, illustrated p. 134, n°A51

Catalogue Note

In 1904, Jean-François-Louis Merlet, journalist from Eclaireur and poet, composes poems on Salome. Mossa is immediatly inspired by his vision of the princess of Judea, her psychology and eroticism, and paints a series of seven watercolors, counting the present work. Standing in front of the prison where the saint was kept captive, Salome holds the plate, smiling, maybe unconscious of the seriousness of death.
The theme of Salome, from the Gospel of Mathew and Mark, became popular again in the 19th century and inspired numerous artists. Mossa is delighted to paint such a story, the falt of innocence, the responsibility of the irresponsible. He first paints the young princess in 1901 in his first painting, and biggest listed (Musée des Beaux-Arts, Nice).
See image next page.

Œuvres sur Papier

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Paris