73
73

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

Maya Stone Hacha of a Jaguar Head
Late Classic, 550 - 950 AD
Estimate
25,00035,000
JUMP TO LOT
73

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

Maya Stone Hacha of a Jaguar Head
Late Classic, 550 - 950 AD
Estimate
25,00035,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

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New York

Maya Stone Hacha of a Jaguar Head
Late Classic, 550 - 950 AD

Provenance

Miguel Covarrubias, Mexico City
John Stokes, New York
European Private Collection, acquired from the above on May 13, 1971

Catalogue Note

The ballgame, which was played as early as the second millennium BC, was one of the defining and enduring cultural features of the ancient Mesoamerican world. The yokes, hachas and palmas, are carved stone trophies and ceremonial equipment, part of the cult attire or symbols of the 'prerogative of participation'. (Wilkerson in Evans, ed., Ancient Mexican Art at Dumbarton Oaks, 2010, p. 239).

The jaguar was of major importance in ancient Mesoamerica and constitute a large category of  the animal head hachas from the Maya region. Jaguar hachas typically show an animated expression with tensed features of open mouth, fleshy snout  but interestingly not carved  with the distinctive cupped ears. The hachas have a small perforation at the upper back for balance and attachment.

On this example, the elongated open snout with massive curved jaw gives definition and contrast to the deeply sunken oval ocular.  For a similar example, see Shook & Marquis, Secrets in Stone: Yokes, Hachas and Palmas from Southern Mesoamerica, 1996, p. 134, no. J14.

Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

|
New York