48
48

OCEANIC ART FROM THE ESTATE OF LYNDA CUNNINGHAM

Maori Bird Snare Perch, New Zealand
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 10,625 USD
JUMP TO LOT
48

OCEANIC ART FROM THE ESTATE OF LYNDA CUNNINGHAM

Maori Bird Snare Perch, New Zealand
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 10,625 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

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New York

Maori Bird Snare Perch, New Zealand

Provenance

Caledonian Market, London
James Hooper, Arundel, acquired at the above in 1934
Christie's, London, July 3, 1990, lot 120
Lynda Cunningham, New York, acquired at the above auction

Literature

Steven Phelps, Art and Artefacts of the Pacific, Africa and the Americas: the James Hooper Collection, London, 1976, p. 34. pl. 3, no. 13

Catalogue Note

Bird catching was a revered activity in Maori society and was performed with a number of different techniques and pieces of equipment. This particular perch, called mutu kaka, lured birds into captivity by way of a looped snare connected to the device. Hunters would plant tools like this one on the ground or in trees and wait for native birds, such as the kaka and the kereru, to land on them. Upon the birds' arrival, the catchers would activate the snare to trap the birds' feet to the perch and prevent them from flying away. Once they killed the captured birds, the Maori consumed the meat, and used the feathers to make highly valued cloaks.

Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

|
New York