Lot 303
  • 303

Tiffany Studios

Estimate
30,000 - 50,000 USD
Log in to view results
bidding is closed

Description

  • Tiffany Studios
  • A Rare "Aquamarine" Exhibition Vase
  • engraved 257J L.C. Tiffany – Favrile Exhibition Pieces
  • favrile glass with "Millefiore" decoration

Provenance

Private Collection, New York
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Condition

Overall in very good condition. With a few very minute air bubble inclusions inherent in the making. The exterior of the vase with some very fine and light surface scratches to the outermost extremities of the body and underbase. The underbase with some evidence of light adhesive residue, and the interior with traces of very light surface soiling. The vase has great scale and presence, and the Aquamarine glass presents great visual depth and movement to the cased millefiore dogwood blossoms, which are rendered in milky white glass with red and yellow centers and highlighted with pale blue and cobalt in the leaf decoration. An impressive example of this rare decorative technique displaying the dogwood blossoms in a highly artistic and impressionistic manner.
In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Catalogue Note

Introduced by Tiffany Studios in circa 1912, "Aquamarine" glass is characterized by its thick layers of glass encasing aquatic imagery or, in the case of the present lot, a floral composition. The green-blue coloration of the glass suggests a sense of liquid fluidity and the casing technique simulates the varied perspectives and refraction of a watery surface.  The technical prowess required to produce "Aquamarine" glass was often stressed by the company itself—these pieces were physically heavy and often did not survive the annealing process because of their many layers.  The rarity of this decorative technique is reinforced by the engraving on the current lot, designating the work as a special exhibition piece.