30
30

PROPERTY ORIGINALLY FROM THE COLLECTION OF JEAN KELLOGG

Edward Weston
1886-1958
NAUTILUS SHELL (CROSS-SECTION)
Estimate
70,000100,000
LOT SOLD. 253,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
30

PROPERTY ORIGINALLY FROM THE COLLECTION OF JEAN KELLOGG

Edward Weston
1886-1958
NAUTILUS SHELL (CROSS-SECTION)
Estimate
70,000100,000
LOT SOLD. 253,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Photographs

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Edward Weston
1886-1958
1886-1958
NAUTILUS SHELL (CROSS-SECTION)
mounted, initialed and dated by the photographer in pencil on the mount, signed and dated by the photographer and inscribed '2S 1927' in an unidentified hand in pencil on the reverse, matted, 1927, probably printed in the 1940s
9 3/8 by 7 1/2 in. (23.8 by 19.1 cm.)
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

The photographer to Jean Kellogg

Acquired from the above by her cousins Abraham and Regula Melden in the 1950s

By descent to the present owner

Literature

Other prints of this image:

Conger F.2

Nancy Newhall, ed., The Daybooks of Edward Weston, Volume II, California (Aperture, 1973), pl. 1

Ben Maddow, Edward Weston: Fifty Years (Aperture, 1973), p. 145

Jennifer A. Watts, ed., Edward Weston: A Legacy (Los Angeles: The Huntington Library, 2003, in conjunction with the exhibition), pl. 1

Susan Danly and Weston J. Naef, Edward Weston in Los Angeles (Los Angeles: The Huntington Library and Art Gallery, 1986, in conjunction with the exhibition), fig. 31

Kathy Kelsey Foley, Edward Weston's Gifts to His Sister (Dayton Art Institute, 1978, in conjunction with the exhibition), p. 44

Judith Hochburg, Sarah Lowe, Michael Mattis, and Dody Weston Thompson, Edward Weston: Life Work (Revere, 2004), pl. 36

Manfred Heiting, ed., Edward Weston (Köln, 2004), p. 104

Catalogue Note

This photograph, and those in Lots 180 through 183, come originally from the collection of painter and printmaker Jean Kellogg (1910-1995). Born in Berkeley and educated at Yale, Kellogg continued her studies at the Art Students League in New York, and through courses offered at the Corcoran Gallery School and Phillips Memorial Gallery in Washington, D. C.

In 1931, Kellogg moved to her family's summer home in the Carmel Highlands, where she began her long apprenticeship with maritime artist Paul Dougherty and became Edward Weston's friend and neighbor.  As part of Weston's artistic circle in the 1930s and 1940s,  Kellogg posed for portraits by Weston's lover Sonya Noskowiak and appeared in several photographs by Weston, most notably Exposition of Dynamic Symmetry (Conger 1724), which was taken at her studio. Just prior to the dissolution of their marriage in 1945, Weston produced his last nude portraits of second wife, Charis Wilson, at the Big Sur cabin that Kellogg shared at the time with Doug Short. As a sign of affection for Kellogg, the photographer named one of his cats, Kelly, for her.  Weston friend and supporter Merle Armitage designed a 1956 edition of Robinson Jeffers's 1929 poem, The Loving Shepherdess, for which Jean Kellogg was the volume's illustrator.

Jean Kellogg married cartoonist and children's book author James Dickie in 1960. They collaborated on the 1988 volume, Design the Natural Way.  Kellogg continued her artistic endeavors, and subsequently ran an art gallery in Monterey, where she died in 1995.

Weston's negative log at the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson records that, of the projected edition of 50, only 16 prints were made from this negative (2S).

Photographs

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