130
130
H. Herbert Sidman
active 1890s-1910s
HENRY W. POOR MANSION, GRAMERCY PARK
Estimate
5,0007,000
JUMP TO LOT
130
H. Herbert Sidman
active 1890s-1910s
HENRY W. POOR MANSION, GRAMERCY PARK
Estimate
5,0007,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Photographs

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New York

H. Herbert Sidman
active 1890s-1910s
ACTIVE 1890S-1910S
HENRY W. POOR MANSION, GRAMERCY PARK

a group of 33 platinum prints, each mounted, the photographer's 'H. H. Sidman' and '8 East 42nd St. N.Y.' blindstamps on the mounts, accompanied by a gelatin silver print of an unidentified farmhouse, circa 1903 (Stanford White's New York, pp. 218 and 228) (34)


Each approximately 11 by 13 1/2 in. (27.3 by 34.2 cm.) and the reverse
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Provenance

Sotheby's New York, 28 April 2004, Sale 7987, Lot 107

Catalogue Note

Henry W. Poor, son of railroad journalist, business editor, and artist Henry Varnum Poor, was a well-educated (Harvard, 1865), socially and financially prominent New York resident known for his love of literature, music, and art.  Financial publisher of the Railroad Manual and a securities broker, Mr. Poor was also a scholarly man who could read a dozen languages. His library rivaled the other great libraries of New York at that time, including those of James Lenox (one of the founders of the New York Public Library) and J. P. Morgan.

A close friend of the architect Stanford White, Poor was convinced by White to purchase the two buildings at 125 and 127 East 21st Street, across Lexington Avenue from his own residence in the Gramercy Park enclave.  Instead of demolishing the building and constructing a new one, White preserved the exteriors and, from 1899 to 1901, completely renovated the interiors, 'among the most exquisite Stanford White ever devised,' showing 'him to the fullest as the great interior designer he was' (Lowe, p. 226).  The opulent mansion, with its emphasis on architectural elements and well-proportioned rooms, was filled with furnishings, ceilings, fireplaces, and doorways purchased by White in Europe--ceilings from Venice and Umbria, gold and silk portieres from Portugal, and a rare 12th-century white marble Italian altar tabernacle (now housed at the Cloisters Museum).

Mr. Poor and his family lived in the mansion until his securities firm failed and he declared bankruptcy in 1907.  The mansion's contents were sold in 1909 in a four-day sale.  The mansion was later demolished to make way for the construction of 1 Lexington Avenue.

For more information, see David Garrard Lowe, Stanford White's New York, pp. 218-29, and The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. 16, pp. 33-4

Photographs

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New York