23
23
Lygia Clark
(1920-1988)
BICHO-EM-SI-MD (NO IV)
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 1,169,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
23
Lygia Clark
(1920-1988)
BICHO-EM-SI-MD (NO IV)
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 1,169,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Latin American Art Modern & Contemporary

|
New York

Lygia Clark
(1920-1988)
BICHO-EM-SI-MD (NO IV)
aluminum
Dimensions Variable, Diameter: 24 3/8 in.
62 cm
Executed in 1960.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

This lot is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity From O Mundo de Lygia Clark with Association Register Number 657 and dated 26 de novembro de 2013.

Provenance

Galeria de Arte Paula Vasconcellos, São Pãulo
Acquired directly from the above by the present owner 1989

Catalogue Note

My latest works have been
called ‘animals’ because of
their essentially organic
aspect. And besides, having
used a hinge to join the plates,
it suddenly reminded me of
a backbone.

The arrangement of the metal
plates determines the positions
of the ‘animal’, which at first sight
appears to be limitless. When asked
what are these possibilities of movement,
I usually answer: ‘I don’t know, neither
do you, but “IT” does.’

The ‘animals’ have no  wrong side.
Each ‘animal’ is an organic entity
completely revealed inside his inner
time of expression.

He is alive, and an essentially active
work. A total, existential interaction
can be established between you and
him. And in this relationship there is no
passivity, neither on your part nor
on his.

There is in fact a dialogue in which
the ‘animal’ gives, to the spectator’s
prompting, well-defined answers.

This relationship, up to now abstract,
between man and the ‘animal’
becomes real.

The ‘animal’ has his own and well-defined
cluster of movements which react
to the promptings of the spectator.
He is not made of isolated static forms
which can be manipulated at random,
as in a game;  no,  his parts are functionally
related to each other, as if he were a living
organism; and the movements of these parts
are interlinked.

The first movement (yours) does not
belong to the ‘animal’. The inter-linking
of the spectator’s action and the ‘animal’s’
immediate answer  is what forms this new
relationship, made possible precisely because
‘the animal’ moves—i.e., has a life of its own.

-Lygia Clark, "Lygia Clark, I 'Animals, 1960", SIGNALS, London, April-May 1965

Latin American Art Modern & Contemporary

|
New York