2151
2151
Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Pole Screen, Philadelphia, circa 1770
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2151
Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Pole Screen, Philadelphia, circa 1770
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拍品詳情

來自卡珊巴斯基金會館藏之喬治‧S‧帕克二世收藏重要美國藝術

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Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Pole Screen, Philadelphia, circa 1770
Height 52 1/4 in. by Width 17 3/4 in. by Depth 16 3/4 in.
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展覽

Harry A. Batten (1897-1966), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
Thence by descent to his daughter;
Christie's, New York, Important American furniture, Silver, Folk Art and Decorative Arts, June 19, 1996, sale 8416, lot 151;
Alan Miller, Quakertown, Pennsylvania.

出版

A similar example is illustrated in Horner, Blue Book Philadelphia Furniture, (Washington, D. C., 1935, rpt. 1977), pl. 144.

相關資料

The fireplace was an architectural, decorative and social focal point of most 18th century homes. Polescreens enabled the sitter closest to the fire to be shielded from the heat and allowed them to read or sew without the distraction of the flickering of flames.  The adjustable screen was usually fitted with a piece of needlework worked by an accomplished daughter of the household.

With turned pillar, compressed ball, and ball and claw feet, this pole screen exhibits all of the quintessential characteristics of early Chippendale Philadelphia furnishings.  Made from the same principle as round tea tables, polescreens consist of a single turned pedestal supported by a tripartite base.  Like other tripod furniture, polescreens could be purchased with carving for an additional cost.

來自卡珊巴斯基金會館藏之喬治‧S‧帕克二世收藏重要美國藝術

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紐約