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The Candlelight Master 
Active in Rome, circa 1620-1640
A PHYSICIAN WITH AN URINE SAMPLE BY CANDLELIGHT
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51
The Candlelight Master 
Active in Rome, circa 1620-1640
A PHYSICIAN WITH AN URINE SAMPLE BY CANDLELIGHT
前往

拍品詳情

Tableaux, Sculptures et Dessins Anciens et du XIXe siècle

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The Candlelight Master 
Active in Rome, circa 1620-1640
A PHYSICIAN WITH AN URINE SAMPLE BY CANDLELIGHT

來源

With Galleria Vangelli, Rome, 1972; 
Private collection, France.

出版

R. Spear, 'Unknown Pictures by the Caravaggisti (with notes on "Caravaggio and his followers")', in: Storia dell'Arte, no. 14, April-June 1972, p. 155, reproduced fig. 17;
B. Nicolson, The international Caravaggesque movement: lists of pictures by Caravaggio and his followers throughout Europe from 1590 to 1650, Oxford 1979, p. 22 (under Doctor examining a Sample of Urine, no. 2);
B. Nicolson, Caravaggism in Europe, Oxford 1989, vol. 1, p. 63, under no. 858, no. 2 (all the above as by Trophime Bigot).

相關資料

The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, holds a very closely comparative work to ours, of similar measurements and datable to circa 1630–1633 (oil on canvas, 72 x 99 cm; inv. no. WA1942.18). Nicolson considered the Oxford picture the prime version of this particular composition. The compositional elements of the two pictures are strikingly similar, observe the basket for the bottle on the left, the gloved hand and the luminous light coming from the candlelit flask. Our picture however radiates a more warm orange-hued light in its chiaroscuro.  

In the 1620s and 1630s the conceit of staging a scene around a single candlelight was employed to great effect by Gerrit van Honthorst and his fellow northern Caravaggisti. One of its key exponents, and the author of this intriguing picture, was an artist whose true identity has for many years been the focus of much scholarly debate, and is still not satisfactorily resolved. In essence three names have been proposed as the artist behind this body of work: The Candlelight Master, Trophime Bigot, and a Maestro Jacomo, or Jacomo Massa. In unpicking the tangled issue of who is who, one can only start with Benedict Nicolson. It was the latter who, in 1960, first identified a cohesive group of stylistically homogeneous pictures and, for want of any documented evidence or signed works, gave the artist the evocative title 'The Candlelight Master' (B. Nicolson, '"The Candlelight Master", a follower of Honthorst in Rome', in: Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek, 1960, pp. 121-164). Nicolson subsequently identified this painter with a documented artist, Trophime Bigot, a native of Arles but known to have worked in Rome between 1620 and 1634, where he was recorded as a painter of nocturnal, half-length figures. However, questions were raised over the marked stylistic differences between the works initially grouped by Nicolson, and other signed works by Bigot that were known in Provence. It was briefly suggested that the Provence pictures may instead have been painted by his father, also called Trophime Bigot, but later documentary evidence proved that there was, in fact, only one artist by that name (J. Boyer, 'One and Only Trophime Bigot', in: The Burlington Magazine, vol. CXXX, no. 1022, May 1988, pp. 355-357). Opinion remained divided on the Bigot hypothesis. Then, thanks to Olivier Michel in 1978, another name came to light in the archive of Santa Maria in Aquiro, Rome. In the church are three altarpieces, one of which Nicolson had included in his original group; the archival document revealed the artist of the pictures in the church as 'Maestro Jacomo'. This opened the question as to whether the whole corpus ought to be then be given to Maestro Jacomo, a question complicated by the fact that Nicolson himself believed different hands to be responsible for the three pictures in the church. More information on this name has been gleaned recently, with an article from 2012 suggesting the three pictures be attributed to a certain Jacomo Massa (A. Amendola, 'La cappella della Passione in Santa Maria in Aquiro: il vero nome di maestro Jacomo', in: Bollettino d'Arte, no. 16, Oct-Dec 2012, pp. 77-85). Research continues towards achieving scholarly consensus over the identity of Nicolson's 'Candlelight Master'.

Tableaux, Sculptures et Dessins Anciens et du XIXe siècle

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巴黎