149
149
Eglon Hendrick van der Neer
A PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN, THREE QUARTER LENGTH, SEATED WITH A LUTE IN A LANDSCAPE
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149
Eglon Hendrick van der Neer
A PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN, THREE QUARTER LENGTH, SEATED WITH A LUTE IN A LANDSCAPE
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拍品詳情

西洋古典油畫及雕塑日拍

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Eglon Hendrick van der Neer
AMSTERDAM CIRCA 1634 - 1703 DÜSSELDORF
A PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN, THREE QUARTER LENGTH, SEATED WITH A LUTE IN A LANDSCAPE
signed on book lower right: E . H. van der / Neer f; 

inscribed on reverse of panel: Van d. N...(?)


oil on copper
10 1/2  by 8 1/2  in.; 26.7 by 21.6 cm. 
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來源

Probably anonymous sale, Paris, Basan, 23 February 1778, lot 47 (to Dubois);
Probably Francois-Pascal Haudry;
Probably his sale, Orléans, Imprimerie de Rouzeau-Montaut, 1800, lot 27;
Probably anonymous sale, Paris, Roux, 12 May 1819, lot 50.

出版

Probably E. Schavemaker, Eglon van der Neer, Doornspijk 2010, p. 530, cat. no. C75 (in section of works known only by description). 

相關資料

Long known only through description, this lovely signed copper depicting a woman playing music in a landscape is a late work by Eglon Hendrick van der Neer, datable to the 1680s when he was living in Brussels.  Delicately rendered with fine detail, this work exemplifies his increased interest during this period in painting pastoral subjects in lush wooded landscapes.  While he regularly returned to depicting women playing lutes throughout his career, it is not until his late career that his settings shifted from interiors to the outdoors.  Here, an elegantly dressed woman, adorned in a beautiful dress with floral and gold details, is seated before sheets of music set on a stand nestled in thick foliage.  On her lap rests a lute whose long neck reaches to the trunk of a tree covered in flowers and leaves.  Behind her extends a graceful landscape with rolling hills of green that softly contrast with her shapely figure and porcelain skin.   

Van der Neer’s mature landscapes are not reminiscent of his training with his father, Aert van der Neer, but rather echo the dense and detailed wooded landscapes of earlier generations, particularly those of Adam Elsheimer.  Such visual parallels, so meticulously and carefully rendered, not only strengthened van der Neer’s already well-established reputation during his lifetime, but also highlight his versatile skills as an artist today.  Also visible here is the continuation of the Fijnschilder tradition founded in Leiden by Gerrit Dou and his pupils almost half a century prior. This tradition, apart from flower painting, would soon run its course by the dawn of the next century, perhaps because works such as this left little room for further refinement. 

We are grateful to Dr. Eddy Schavemaker for confirming the attribution of the present lot on the basis of images and for suggesting it is a late work by the artist, datable to the 1680s. 

西洋古典油畫及雕塑日拍

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