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A pair of George III silver vegetable dishes on two-handled hot-water stands, Paul Storr of Storr & Co. for Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, London, 1813
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A pair of George III silver vegetable dishes on two-handled hot-water stands, Paul Storr of Storr & Co. for Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, London, 1813
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拍品詳情

The Neil & Gina Smith Collection

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倫敦

A pair of George III silver vegetable dishes on two-handled hot-water stands, Paul Storr of Storr & Co. for Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, London, 1813
the circular dishes each engraved twice on the interiors with a crest between an earl's coronet above and a ducal crest coronet below applied cast gadroon borders with leaf-flanked shells at intervals, the stands similarly engraved above massive leaf and scroll supports, gadroon lips and double lion head, reed, shell and foliate handles, complete with two contemporary Sheffield plate heaters with tinned undersides, the undersides of the dishes and stands stamped: '964,' the undersides of the dishes further stamped: '37 17' and '38 10,' with two modern electroplated flower wires
38.5cm., 15 1/8in. over handles
8053gr., 258oz. 18dwt. of silver
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來源

The bases and heaters, Christie's, from A Collection of Paul Storr Silver, the property of Robert H. and Lucile D. Gries, New York, 23 October 2000, lot 359

The dishes, The Lion Mark, Winnetka, Illinois, 1975;
Christies, Important Silver, Objects of Vertu and Russian Works of Art, The Collection of Alan and Simone Hartman, New York, 20 October 1999, lot 245

相關資料

The crest, coronet and crest coronet are those of Toler, Earls of Norbury, a title first bestowed on the judge and politician, John Toler (1745-1831), second son of Daniel Toler of Beechwood, co. Tipperary, upon his retirement as Chief Justice of the Common Pleas on 23 June 1827. Before that date, on 27 December 1800, he was elevated to the peerage as Baron Norbury of Ballycrenode, co. Tipperary. Known as the ‘Hanging Judge,’ he died at Cabra, near Dublin on 27 July 1831 at the age of 85, when he was succeeded by his second son, Hector John Graham-Toler (1781-1839), who had taken the additional surname of Graham in honour of his mother, Grace (d. 1822), daughter of Hector Graham, Secondary of the Irish Court of Common Pleas, by his wife Isabella Maxwell, daughter of Robert Maxwell, of Fellows Hall. The 2nd Earl was married on 1 January 1808 in Rutland Square, Dublin to Elizabeth (d. 1859), only daughter and heir of William Brabazon of Brabazon Park, co. Meath.

In January 1839 the 2nd Earl was murdered:
‘DEATH OF THE EARL OF NORBURY. The assassins of this nobleman, to whom all men of all parties render the praise of an inoffensive, amiable, benevolent, and useful man, have been but too successful. The noble earl expired on Thursday at noon, after 43 hours’ suffering. . . .’ (The Standard, London, Monday, 7 January 1839, p. 2a)
This unhappy event took place on the Earl’s Durrow Castle estate, three days after a tenant had been evicted.

Whether these vegetable dishes were the property of the 1st or the 2nd Earl of Norbury is not known for certain. Other items of silver of 1813 engraved with the arms of Graham-Toler with Brabazon for the 2nd Earl and circa, bearing the mark of Paul Storr for Rundell, Bridge & Rundell are recorded. These include an entrée dish and cover (Christie’s, New York, 11 April 2003, lot 229).

These vegetable dishes and stands were separated many years ago before being discovered in separate auctions in New York by the present owner in October, 1999 and October, 2000. 

The Neil & Gina Smith Collection

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倫敦