135
135

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Théo van Rysselberghe
FAUX-POIVRIERS ET ABUTILON
前往
135

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Théo van Rysselberghe
FAUX-POIVRIERS ET ABUTILON
前往

拍品詳情

Impressionist and Modern Art

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Théo van Rysselberghe
1862 - 1926年
FAUX-POIVRIERS ET ABUTILON
monogramed VR and dated 1913 (towards upper right)
oil on board
73,1 x 60,2 cm; 28 3/4 x 23 3/4 in.
Painted in 1913.
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The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by Olivier Bertrand and it will be included in his forthcoming Catalogue raisonné.

來源

Galerie Georges Giroux, Brussels
Lucien Hauman (acquired from the above in 1921)
Mlle Hauman, Brussels
Thence by descent to the present owner

展覽

Paris, Galerie Druet, Théo van Rysselberghe, 1913, no. 30 (titled Abutilon et faux poivrier)
Laren, Larense Kunsthandel, Théo van Rysselberghe, 1913, no. 54 (titled Abutilon et faux-poivrier)
Brussels, Galerie Georges Giroux, Esthétique Nouvelle, 1921, no. 205 (titled Bouquet de faux-poivriers et d'abutilon)
Brussels, Galerie Giroux, Rétrospective Théo van Rysselberghe, 1927, no. 67 (titled Faux-poivriers et abutilons)
Copenhagen, Carlsberg Glyptotek, Belgisk Kunst, 1931, no. 172 (titled Poivrier et Abutilon)
Brussels, Palais des Beaux-Arts & The Hague, Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, Théo van Rysselberghe, 2006, n.n., illustrated in the catalogue

出版

Ronald Feltkamp, Théo Van Rysselberghe, Catalogue raisonné 1862-1926, Paris, 2003, no. 1913-018, illustrated p. 406 (titled Abutilon, faux-poivriers et hibiscus)

相關資料

Faux-poivriers et abutilon demonstrates a remarkable technical mastery that corresponds to a new period of maturity. As Paul Fierens describes: "Around 1900, Van Rysselberghe’s art began to loosen up. The colourist gradually abandoned the orthodoxy of Neo-impressionism.[...] He made his mark by combining pure shades of colour with a new freedom. [...] He no longer seemed to look towards anything except his own instinct and senses when choosing hues and the impact of colours, as well as in the arrangement of lines." (Paul Fierens, Théo Van Rysselberghe, Brussels, 1937, p. 27).
Lucien Hauman, the famous Belgian botanist, was the first collector to own this work. Several species of plants are named after him, as are the botanical gardens at the University of Buenos Aires.

Impressionist and Modern Art

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