351
351

PROPERTY FROM A PROMINENT EAST COAST COLLECTION

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
JEAN RENOIR EN MÉDAILLON
前往
351

PROPERTY FROM A PROMINENT EAST COAST COLLECTION

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
JEAN RENOIR EN MÉDAILLON
前往

拍品詳情

印象派及現代藝術日拍

|
紐約

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
1841 - 1919年
JEAN RENOIR EN MÉDAILLON
Signed Renoir. (center right)
Oil on canvas
11 1/8 by 9 1/2 in.
28.3 by 24.1 cm
Painted in 1895. 
參閱狀況報告 參閱狀況報告

This work will be included in the forthcoming Renoir Digital Catalogue Raisonné, currently being prepared under the sponsorship of the Wildenstein Plattner Institute, Inc.

來源

Estate of the artist
François Pacquement, Paris
Acquired circa 1990s

展覽

Paris, Galerie Schmit, Lumières sur la peinture, XIXe-XXe siècles, 1983, no. 75, illustrated in color in the catalogue

出版

Bernheim-Jeune, ed., L'Atelier de Renoir, vol. I, Paris, 1931, no. 137, illustrated pl. 46
Guy-Patrice & Michel Dauberville, Renoir, Catalogue raisonné des tableaux, pastels, dessins et aquarelles, 1895-1902, Paris, 2007, no. 2391, illustrated p. 398

相關資料

The present portrait of Renoir’s second son Jean is an insightful example of one of the artist’s favorite subjects: his children. While Renoir completed numerous commissions of children's portraits during the early part of his career, the birth of his three sons at the turn of the century presaged a more considered and detailed approach to his figure painting. Executed in 1895 when Jean was only one year old, Jean Renoir exhibits the artist’s ability to render Impressionist portraits with an enchanting intimacy and distinct charm.

Renoir frequently turned to his sons for inspiration, seeking to capture their transition from infants to young boys. By using a constellation of soft, feathery brushstrokes, Renoir skillfully conveys the tangibility of the baby’s plump cheeks, drawing inspiration from the art of Titian, Peter-Paul Rubens and Diego Velázquez. He captures the nuances of color across Jean’s face in a delicate interplay of pale tones, achieving the distinctly soft surface of a baby’s skin. Jean was one of Renoir’s most obedient sitters, who was willing to sit quietly for hours on end with only a rattle to keep him amused. 

In 1888, Renoir wrote to his dealer Georges Durand-Ruel (who later would become Jean’s godfather) about his latest efforts: “I have taken up again, never to abandon it, my old style, soft and light of touch. This is to give you some idea of my new and final manner of painting—like Fragonard, but not so good" (quoted in John House, Renoir in the Barnes Foundation, New Haven, 2012, p. 121). The present work epitomizes Renoir’s intentions in its joyous simplicity. This “new and final manner” that Renoir described to Durand-Ruel was an immediate success, bringing long-awaited fame for the artist in the 1890s. George Rivière has asserted that “In Renoir’s figure painting, portraiture deserves a place unto itself. For no other artist has looked so deeply into his sitter’s soul, nor captured its essence with such economy” (quoted in Colin Bailey, Renoir’s Portraits: Impressions of an Age, New Haven, 1997, p. 1).

Jean Renoir was born in September 1894 when the family was living in the Château des Brouillards in Montmartre, which is most likely where this oil was executed. Jean went on to have a successful artistic career in his own right as a celebrated film-maker and his memoirs, Renoir, My Father (1962), along with Renoir’s own paintings of his children, are the most affectionate record of the family’s domestic happiness (see fig. 1). 

印象派及現代藝術日拍

|
紐約