557
557

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, JAPAN

Vittorio Matteo Corcos
ITALIAN
THE THREE ACES
前往
557

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, JAPAN

Vittorio Matteo Corcos
ITALIAN
THE THREE ACES
前往

拍品詳情

十九世紀歐洲繪畫

|
紐約

Vittorio Matteo Corcos
1859 - 1933
ITALIAN
THE THREE ACES
signed V. Corcos and dated 91. (upper left)
oil on canvas
43 3/4 by 31 1/2 in.
111.1 by 80 cm
參閱狀況報告 參閱狀況報告

來源

Sale: Sotheby Parke-Bernet, New York, May 14, 1976, lot 221, illustrated
Richard Green, London
Acquired in Tokyo circa 2000

相關資料

Originally from the Italian port city of Livorno, Vittorio Matteo Corcos showed his aptitude as an artist from a young age. At sixteen he was admitted into an advanced position at Florence’s Academia di Belle Arti, followed by study in Naples with the artist Domenico Morelli, who encouraged his move to Paris in 1880. Upon arriving in Paris, Corcos quickly introduced himself to the Italian expatriate artists Giuseppe de Nittis and Giovanni Boldini. Both artists would influence Corcos greatly, and De Nittis hosted regular salons which allowed Corcos to meet such luminaries as Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas, Gustave Caillebotte and, perhaps most consequentially, his dealer, Adolphe Goupil.

By 1891, the year The Three Aces was painted, Corcos had returned to Italy with an established reputation and a Parisian dealer.  Goupil was a savvy commercial enterprise, and decorative prints and paintings of enticing young women was one of their specialties. In a recent review of the Corcos retrospective at the Palazzo Zabarella in Padua, Roderick Conway Morris describes what The Three Aces makes evident: "technical skills in reproducing luxurious women’s fashions and the milky-white and subtly blushing complexions of the young ladies wearing them made him an ideal supplier… Corcos was also adept at infusing these paintings with a fresh-faced sexuality without exceeding the bounds of bourgeois decorum, and Goupil admiringly described him as a painter who was 'chastely impure;" (Morris, "A Reassessment of Corcos, Sensuality and Subtlety Intact," New York Times, October 7, 2014).

While Corcos enjoyed wide artistic acclaim and great financial success in his lifetime, his contributions to art during the Belle Époque remain somewhat overlooked outside of his native Italy. He had a reputation for being the "peintres des jolies femmes" (a moniker given to him by The Times correspondent Henri De Blowitz that followed him for his entire career), but he also produced an idiosyncratic body of work which includes psychologically rich interpretations of the world and people around him.

十九世紀歐洲繪畫

|
紐約