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ALL THAT IS GLORIOUS AROUND US: PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT AMERICAN COLLECTOR

Thomas Cole
INDIANS VIEWING LANDSCAPE
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38

ALL THAT IS GLORIOUS AROUND US: PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT AMERICAN COLLECTOR

Thomas Cole
INDIANS VIEWING LANDSCAPE
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拍品詳情

American Art

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Thomas Cole
1801 - 1848
INDIANS VIEWING LANDSCAPE
signed T. Col* indistinctly (on the reverse)
oil on panel
6 by 7  7/8  inches
(15.2 by 20 cm)
Painted circa 1840.
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來源

Worthington Whittredge, Summit, New Jersey (the artist)
Estate of the above
Acquired by the present owner, by 1978

展覽

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Miniature Exhibition, December 1978-February 1979
New York, Alexander Gallery, Landscapes of the Hudson River School: First Public Exhibition of a Private Collection, November 1979
University Park, Pennsylvania, Palmer Museum of Art, The Pennsylvania State University, All That Is Glorious Around Us: Paintings from the Hudson River School on Loan from a Friend of the Museum of Art, January-March 1981, no. 13, pp. 16, 19, 58, 123, illustrated p. 17
Newark, Delaware, University Gallery, University of Delaware, An Intimate View: Hudson River Landscapes from a Private Collection, April-May 1985
Ithaca, New York, Handwerker Gallery, Ithaca College, The American Landscape, January-February 1995
Annville, Pennsylvania, Suzanne H. Arnold Art Gallery, Lebanon Valley College, Passages: Images of Transition in 19th-Century American Landscape Painting, August-October 1995
Greensburg, Pennsylvania, Westmoreland Museum of American Art; University Park, Pennsylvania, Palmer Museum of Art, Pennsylvania State University; Worcester, Massachusetts, Worcester Art Museum; New York, The National Academy, All That Is Glorious Around Us: Paintings from the Hudson River School, August 1997-September 1999, pp. 18, 50, illustrated p. 51

相關資料

In his description of this work, the scholar Dr. John Driscoll writes: "When the human figure appears in these paintings, it is usually fulfilling one of three basic purposes. The simplest purpose is that of a technical nature, acting as a conduit through which the viewer gains unimpeded entrance to the scene. The second role for humankind is that of enjoying, in genre-like fashion, the landscape. Finally, the most telling, is the inclusion of the human figure as a counterpoint to the landscape that conveys a sense of wonder, of awe, or perhaps one of fear or terror before the imponderable character of nature. The best paintings, of course, have the figure serving all three purposes at once" (All That Is Glorious Around Us: Paintings from the Hudson River School on Loan from a Friend of the Museum of Art, University Park, Pennsylvania, 1983, pp. 16, 19).

American Art

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